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I am using java on debian 5

java version "1.6.0_20"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_20-b02)
Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (build 16.3-b01, mixed mode, sharing)

Why is there a difference between the following

Case 1:

import java.util.*;

Case 2:

import java.util.*;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;

Why doesnt the first case cover the second case?

The code only compiles when I import Arrays and List explicitly.

Code:

import java.util.*;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;

public class Test {
        public static void main (String[] args) {
                List<Integer> i = new ArrayList(Arrays.asList(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10));
                List<Integer> j = new ArrayList();
                ListIterator<Integer> n = i.listIterator(i.size());

                while(n.hasPrevious()) {
                        j.add(n.previous());
                }

                println(j);

        }

        static void println(Object o) {
                System.out.println(o);
        }

        static void print(Object o) {
                System.out.print(o);
        }

}

The error I get when I comment out the 2nd and 3rd import statements are:

nattyp@debian:~/dev/java$ javac Test.java
Test.java:7: cannot find symbol
symbol  : method asList(int,int,int,int,int,int,int,int,int,int)
location: class Arrays
                List<Integer> i = new ArrayList(Arrays.asList(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10));
                                                      ^
Note: Test.java uses unchecked or unsafe operations.
Note: Recompile with -Xlint:unchecked for details.
1 error
nattyp@debian:~/dev/java$
share|improve this question
    
Can you show the code? –  Nikita Rybak Dec 28 '10 at 2:46
    
I have added the code. It works OK, but requires 2nd and 3rd import statements. I was thinking I would only need the first one. I am also wondering if it is specific to debian. I installed using the debs not the Oracle/Sun download –  nattyP Dec 28 '10 at 4:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have just compile it and it compiles fine without the implicit import, probably you're seeing a stale cache or something of your IDE.

Have you tried compiling from the command line?

I have the exact same version:

here it is

Probably you're thinking the warning is an error.

UPDATE

It looks like you have a Arrays.class file in the directory where you're trying to compile ( probably created before ). That's why the explicit import solves the problem. Try copying your source code to a clean new directory and try again. You'll see there is no error this time. Or, clean up your working directory and remove the Arrays.class

share|improve this answer
    
I see the warnings, but when I comment out the 2nd and 3rd import statements I get an error. I have updated the post to show the actual error. –  nattyP Dec 28 '10 at 14:42
    
It doesn't make sense. Are you sure you're not including some other class named Arrays? Ok, I think I got it... updating my answer. –  OscarRyz Dec 28 '10 at 15:52
    
That was it. There was an Arrays.class in the same dir. Thanks. –  nattyP Dec 28 '10 at 18:13
    
@nattyP I'm glad it helped. BTW, you can mark this answer as accepted, so the next guy who has the same problem may identify quickly the solution. –  OscarRyz Dec 28 '10 at 18:33

The difference between

import java.util.*;

and

import java.util.*;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Arrays;

becomes apparent when the code refers to some other List or Arrays (for example, in the same package, or also imported generally). In the first case, the compiler will assume that the Arrays declared in the same package is the one to use, in the latter, since it is declared specifically, the more specific java.util.Arrays will be used.

share|improve this answer

Case 1 should have worked. I don't see anything wrong. There may be some other problems. I would suggest a clean build.

share|improve this answer
1  
My thoughts too. I was just wondering if this was a common issue for Java programmers. –  nattyP Dec 28 '10 at 4:42

Take a look at this forum http://htmlcoderhelper.com/why-is-using-a-wild-card-with-a-java-import-statement-bad/. Theres a discussion on how using wildcards can lead to conflicts if you add new classes to the packages and if there are two classes with the same name in different packages where only one of them will be imported.

Update


It gives that warning because your the line should actually be

List<Integer> i = new ArrayList<Integer>(Arrays.asList(0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10));
List<Integer> j = new ArrayList<Integer>();

You need to specify the type for array list or the compiler will give that warning because it cannot identify that you are using the list in a type safe way.

share|improve this answer
2  
That doesn't really answer the question, does it? –  Nikita Rybak Dec 28 '10 at 4:07
    
Not really, but it was good info. Thanks for the quick response. –  nattyP Dec 28 '10 at 4:34
    
It gives that warning because your the line should actually be List<Integer> i = new ArrayList<Integer>(...); You need to specify the type for array list or the compiler will give that warning because it cannot identify that you are using the list in a type safe way. –  MBU Dec 28 '10 at 5:57
    
Thanks. I get that. –  nattyP Dec 28 '10 at 14:41

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