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Basically, take a matrix and change it so that its mean is equal to 0 and variance is 1. I'm using numpy's arrays so if it can already do it it's better, but I can implement it myself as long as I can find an algorithm.

edit: nvm nimrodm has a better implementation

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1  
Define "change". What if, say, we just replace the matrix with the identity matrix or something? What kinds of transformations are OK? –  Karl Knechtel Dec 28 '10 at 7:23
    
Just out of curiosity, why do you need to do this? –  Drew Hall Dec 28 '10 at 7:43
    
I'm trying to implement a computer vision algorithm that asks for this operation to be performed in the intermediate steps. I think it's because it's a requirement for PCA but I'm not sure. –  pnodbnda Dec 28 '10 at 7:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Take each element and subtract with the mean and then divide by the standard deviation.

Shoot me, I don't know python. In general the above is

mu = Average()
sig = StandardDeviation()
for(i=0;i<rows;i++)
{
   for(j=0;j<cols;j++)
   {
       A[i,j] = (A[i,j]-mu)/sig;
   }
}
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Note: this will work, but it's going to be slow for large matrices. @nimrodm's answer will be much faster as it'll benefit from numpy's optimizations. –  Achal Dave Mar 10 '14 at 7:19
1  
Yes, please use Numpy. I just wanted to show "in theory" how to normalize. –  ja72 Mar 16 '14 at 13:49

The following subtracts the mean of A from each element (the new mean is 0), then normalizes the result by the standard deviation.

  from numpy import *
  A = (A - mean(A)) / std(A)
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