Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

While implementing this generic merge sort, as a kind of Code Kata, I stumbled on a difference between IEnumerable and List that I need help to figure out.

Here's the MergeSort

public class MergeSort<T>
{
    public IEnumerable<T> Sort(IEnumerable<T> arr)
    {
        if (arr.Count() <= 1) return arr;

        int middle = arr.Count() / 2;
        var left = arr.Take(middle).ToList();
        var right = arr.Skip(middle).ToList();
        return Merge(Sort(left), Sort(right));
    }

    private static IEnumerable<T> Merge(IEnumerable<T> left, IEnumerable<T> right)
    {
        var arrSorted = new List<T>();

        while (left.Count() > 0 && right.Count() > 0)
        {
            if (Comparer<T>.Default.Compare(left.First(), right.First()) < 0)
            {
                arrSorted.Add(left.First());
                left=left.Skip(1);
            }
            else
            {
                arrSorted.Add(right.First());  
                right=right.Skip(1);  
            }
        }

        return arrSorted.Concat(left).Concat(right);
    }
}

If I remove the .ToList() on the left and right variables it fails to sort correctly. Do you see why?

Example

var ints = new List<int> { 5, 8, 2, 1, 7 };
var mergeSortInt = new MergeSort<int>();
var sortedInts = mergeSortInt.Sort(ints);

With .ToList()

    [0]: 1
    [1]: 2
    [2]: 5
    [3]: 7
    [4]: 8

Without .ToList()

    [0]: 1
    [1]: 2
    [2]: 5
    [3]: 7
    [4]: 2

Edit

It was my stupid test that got me.

I tested it like this:

var sortedInts = mergeSortInt.Sort(ints);
ints.Sort();
if (Enumerable.SequenceEqual(ints, sortedInts)) Console.WriteLine("ints sorts ok");

just changing the first row to

var sortedInts = mergeSortInt.Sort(ints).ToList();

removes the problem (and the lazy evaluation).

EDIT 2010-12-29

I thought I would figure out just how the lazy evaluation messes things up here but I just don't get it.

Remove the .ToList() in the Sort method above like this

var left = arr.Take(middle);
var right = arr.Skip(middle);

then try this

var ints = new List<int> { 5, 8, 2 };
var mergeSortInt = new MergeSort<int>();
var sortedInts = mergeSortInt.Sort(ints);
ints.Sort();
if (Enumerable.SequenceEqual(ints, sortedInts)) Console.WriteLine("ints sorts ok");

When debugging You can see that before ints.Sort() a sortedInts.ToList() returns

[0]: 2
[1]: 5
[2]: 8

but after ints.Sort() it returns

[0]: 2
[1]: 5
[2]: 5

What is really happening here?

share|improve this question
1  
Must say that it worked well on my PC after removing ToList() –  nan Dec 28 '10 at 10:01
4  
Here's another fail-to-reproduce example (using mono): ideone.com/7mllZ –  Kobi Dec 28 '10 at 10:03
1  
The only suspicious part I see is left=left.Skip(1), which might have problems with delayed execution, but I can't see how. –  Kobi Dec 28 '10 at 10:07
    
I can't see what you said. –  Saeed Amiri Dec 28 '10 at 10:10
1  
I've implemented a fully lazy evaluated version alicebobandmallory.com/articles/2011/01/01/… –  Jonas Elfström Jan 1 '11 at 21:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+100

Your function is correct - if you inspect the result of Merge, you'll see the result is sorted (example).
So where's the problem? Just as you've suspected, you're testing it wrong - when you call Sort on your original list you change all collections that derive from it!
Here's a snippet that demonstrates what you did:

List<int> numbers = new List<int> {5, 4};
IEnumerable<int> first = numbers.Take(1);
Console.WriteLine(first.Single()); //prints 5
numbers.Sort();
Console.WriteLine(first.Single()); //prints 4!

All collections you create are basically the same as first - in a way, they are lazy pointers to positions in ints. Obviously, when you call ToList, the problem is eliminated.

Your case is more complex than that. Your Sort is part lazy, exactly as you suggest: First you create a list (arrSorted) and add integers to it. That part isn't lazy, and is the reason you see the first few elements sorted. Next, you add the remaining elements - but Concat is lazy. Now, recursion enters to mess this even more: In most cases, most elements on your IEnumerable are eager - you create lists out of left and right, which are also made of mostly eager + lazy tail. You end up with a sorted List<int>, lazily concated to a lazy pointer, which should be just the last element (other elements were merged before).
Here's a call graph of your functions - red indicated a lazy collection, black a real number:

alt text

When you change the list the new list is mostly intact, but the last element is lazy, and point to the position of the largest element in the original list.

The result is mostly good, but its last element still points to the original list:

alt text

One last example: consider you're changing all elements in the original list. As you can see, most elements in the sorted collection remain the same, but the last is lazy and points to the new value:

var ints = new List<int> { 3,2,1 };
var mergeSortInt = new MergeSort<int>();
var sortedInts = mergeSortInt.Sort(ints);
// sortedInts is { 1, 2, 3 }
for(int i=0;i<ints.Count;i++) ints[i] = -i * 10;
// sortedInts is { 1, 2, 0 }

Here's the same example on Ideone: http://ideone.com/FQVR7

share|improve this answer
    
I get that. I also get that mutable collections and lazy evaluation is a terrible mix. What I don't get is how it messes up the sort in this case because an already sorted list shouldn't be a problem. Unless my little MergeSort isn't totally lazy but just half lazy or something. –  Jonas Elfström Dec 31 '10 at 0:17
    
@Jonas - I've updated my explanation with more details, it seems there's more than a little complexity in your code :) –  Kobi Dec 31 '10 at 10:51
    
Fantastic explanation! Now I finally get it. Thanks! –  Jonas Elfström Jan 1 '11 at 10:27
    
I implemented a fully lazy evaluated version and blogged about it and the problems I faced. alicebobandmallory.com/articles/2011/01/01/… –  Jonas Elfström Jan 1 '11 at 21:58
1  
Answer has pictures and functional theory? Have an upvote! –  F.Aquino Dec 1 '11 at 20:29

Unable to reproduce - I've just tried this, and it works absolutely fine. Obviously it's rather inefficient in various ways, but removing the ToList calls didn't make it fail.

Here's my test code, with your MergeSort code as-is, but without the ToList() calls:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public static class Extensions
{
    public static void Dump<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, string name)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(name);
        foreach (T item in items)
        {
            Console.Write(item);
            Console.Write(" ");
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
    }
}

class Test
{    
    static void Main()
    {
        var ints = new List<int> { 5, 8, 2, 1, 7 };
        var mergeSortInt = new MergeSort<int>();
        var sortedInts = mergeSortInt.Sort(ints);
        sortedInts.Dump("Sorted");
    }
}

Output:

Sorted
1 2 5 7 8

Perhaps the problem was how you were testing your code?

share|improve this answer
    
I thought I would figure out just how the lazy evaluation messes things up here but I just don't get it. I added a new example to the question. –  Jonas Elfström Dec 29 '10 at 10:45

I ran it with and without the list and it worked.
Anyway, one of the strengths points of merge sort is its ability to sort in-place with O(1) space complexity that this implementation will not benefit.

share|improve this answer
    
Merge sort doesn't claim to be O(1) complexity. It's O(n log n). –  Jon Skeet Dec 28 '10 at 9:59
    
It doesn't claim to, but it can be implemented in O(1) space complexity and a small constant factor for the O(nlgn) time complexity which are both lack here. –  Itay Karo Dec 28 '10 at 10:01
    
Ah, do you mean space complexity? I've never heard of "place complexity" before. If so, yes, that's true. This is inefficient in a number of ways, but I assume it's for educational experimentation, which is fine. –  Jon Skeet Dec 28 '10 at 10:01
    
Might be my English fault, I'll fix it, thanks:) –  Itay Karo Dec 28 '10 at 10:02
    
Makes sense now, thanks :) –  Jon Skeet Dec 28 '10 at 10:11

The problem is you sort the left right, than the right side and merge to one sequence. That does not mean that you get a completely sorted sequence.

First you have to merge and than you have to sort:

public IEnumerable<T> Sort(IEnumerable<T> arr)
{
    if (arr.Count() <= 1) return arr;

    int middle = arr.Count() / 2;
    var left = arr.Take(middle).ToList();
    var right = arr.Skip(middle).ToList();

    // first merge and than sort
    return Sort(Merge(left, right));
}
share|improve this answer
3  
This completely defeats the purpose of merge sort - you might as well Sort(arr) - you suggest to split and merge (= do nothing), and then sort :) –  Kobi Dec 28 '10 at 9:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.