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I want to make my code better. Can I safely rewrite the first example to the second?

IQueryable<PDF> pdfList = (from pdfobj in pdfDataContext.PDFs
                           where pdfobj.Id == pdfId
                           select pdfobj);
if (pdfList.Count() > 0)
{
  PDF pdfOldWay = pdfList.FirstOrDefault();
  pdfOldWay. // do something. (pdfOldWay can't be null here...)
}

--

PDF pdfNewWay = (from pdfobj in pdfDataContext.PDFs 
                 where pdfobj.Id == pdfId 
                 select pdfobj).SingleOrDefault();
if (pdfNewWay != null)
{
  // do something
}

--

EDIT:

Sorry for not being clear. My issue is to get the PDF object out directly without having to use a list first. I don't want to make a check for count is greater than 0 and because it just doesn't look good.

share|improve this question
    
It would really help if you could format your code samples so that they don't require scrolling - especially when the scrolled content is so crucial. I'll edit it now, but if you could do it yourself in future, it would be appreciated. –  Jon Skeet Dec 28 '10 at 10:08
    
Sorry. Sure I'll do it in the future. –  radbyx Dec 28 '10 at 10:12
    
What do you mean by "safely" the second might throw an exception that the first wouldn't. So does safe mean the same functionality? or does it imply something else? –  Rune FS Dec 28 '10 at 11:27
    
is it true that calling SingleOrDefault() can't cast a NullPointException? Because i don't know the answer for that, i maded the first (hacked?) solution. –  radbyx Dec 28 '10 at 11:35
1  
FirstOrDefault or SingleOrDefault are best in your case. In other cases where you're expecting more than one result use .Any() instead of Count > 0. Counting is much more expensive than just seeing if there's anything there. –  jessehouwing Feb 24 '12 at 11:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, that looks safe. You can also simplify your query slightly:

PDF pdfNewWay = pdfDataContext.PDFs.SingleOrDefault(p => p.Id == pdfId);
if (pdfNewWay != null)
{
  // do something
}

The only difference between SingleOrDefault and FirstOrDefault is that SingleOrDefault will throw an exception if more than one match is found, so unless you want this check then you may as well stick to FirstOrDefault.

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single will also throw exception if no element is found. –  Bilal Fazlani Nov 21 '12 at 2:57
    
@billal - not true –  Denis Jul 18 '13 at 21:33
    
@Denis No, that's true. SingleOrDefault will not throw an exception, which might be what you meant? –  jedd.ahyoung Mar 29 '14 at 0:26

You should use FirstOrDefault in the second case too as SingleOrDefault will throw an exception if there is more than one item. Is that ok for you?

On the other hand if you want to guarantee that there is only one pdfobject for some id than using SignleOrDefault is better.

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As an aside it might also be worth mentioning that if it's LINQ-To-Entity SingleOrDefault can't be used –  Rune FS Dec 28 '10 at 11:29
    
This is true also, thx. I marked the other answer because it also helped me with simplifying my code. –  radbyx Dec 29 '10 at 13:13

If it's guaranteed that it always has 0 or 1 rows, then sure, SingleOrDefault is the best solution.

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1  
I don't know if our solution is super good. But we use SingleOrDefault() even though i can guaranteer for max 1 instance. The argument is. If there is more than one instance with same id, it is a mistake/error, and throwing a exception is good because im getting notified. –  radbyx Dec 28 '10 at 11:48
    
Beside that i totally agree with you - ty. –  radbyx Dec 28 '10 at 11:49

Yes you will achieve the same result, I don't see any issue.

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Note the difference between FirstOrDefault in the first sample and SingleOrDefault in the second. –  Jon Skeet Dec 28 '10 at 10:08

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