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I want to write an sql query , and want to get the dept name from DEPT table who has no employees assigned in EMP table.

Table Structure:

EMP
EMPNO   ENAME    DEPTNO

DEPT
DEPTNO   DNAME

So I like to know those DEPT who has no employees association.

Thanks

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you may either use a left join and check for NULLs or you can use a sub query –  bernd_k Dec 28 '10 at 11:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's only correct with NOT EXISTS

SELECT D.DNAME
FROM DEPT D
WHERE
 NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM EMP E WHERE D.DEPTNO = E.DEPTNO)

or EXCEPT, more complex in this case

SELECT D.DNAME
FROM DEPT D
EXCEPT
SELECT D.DNAME
FROM DEPT D
JOIN 
EMP E WHERE D.DEPTNO = E.DEPTNO

Both should give the same plan (with a left anti semi join)

Notes on other answers:

  • A LEFT JOIN will give one row per employee. You'd need DISTINCT. Which compromises the plan compared with NOT EXISTS

  • NOT IN will give false results if there is an Employee who has no Department. NOT IN with a NULL in the list fails

So generally one should use NOT EXISTS or EXCEPT

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Could you add info about which dbms you tried? On Oracle, the first query will generate an anti join (hash or nl depending on data distribution) whereas the second query causes results in two sorts. –  Ronnis Dec 28 '10 at 12:28
    
@Ronnis: SQL server. Based on experience and this stackoverflow.com/questions/4249891/… –  gbn Dec 28 '10 at 12:31
select dname from dept where deptno not in (select deptno from emp)
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Let's hope every employee has a department. CEO may not have a department and deptno could be NULL = fail... –  gbn Dec 28 '10 at 11:51
SELECT D.DNAME
FROM DEPT D
LEFT JOIN EMP E ON D.DEPTNO = E.DEPTNO
WHERE E.DEPTNO IS NULL

UPDATE:

@bernd_k pointed out that DISTINCT is not necessary (SELECT DISTINCT D.DNAME ...) in this case - even without it no duplicate departments will be returned.

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It works, but why are you using distinct? –  bernd_k Dec 28 '10 at 11:44
1  
@bernd_k: you'd get one row per EMP. So you need DISTINCT. Which was added after on a quick update so does not show as an edit... –  gbn Dec 28 '10 at 11:45
1  
@gbn but those where excluded by the where clause. I get no duplicates for the unjoined departments. DISTINCT is not needed –  bernd_k Dec 28 '10 at 11:51
1  
@bernd_k: this is actually a special case. Generally, you usually need DISTINCT to compensate for multiple rows caused by the JOIN. –  gbn Dec 28 '10 at 11:52
    
@gbn In those cases, when I only select columns from the left table I prefer the where in ... construct, to avoid DISTINCT –  bernd_k Dec 28 '10 at 11:56
SELECT D.DEPTNO
FROM EMP E
JOIN DEPT D ON D.DEPTNO = E.DEPTNO (+)
WHERE E.EMPNO IS NULL;
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