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In my code there is a loop that adds sth like that "number," to stringstream. When it ends, I need to extract ',' add '}' and add '{' if the loop is to repeated.

I thought i can use ignore() to remove ',' but it didn't work. Do you know how I can do what I describe?

example:

douCoh << '{';
for(unsigned int i=0;i<dataSize;i++)
  if(v[i].test) douCoh << i+1 << ',';
douCoh.get(); douCoh << '}';
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1  
Please add some example to illustrate your point. –  Shamim Hafiz Dec 28 '10 at 12:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can extract the string (with the str() member), remove the last char with std::string::erase and then reset the new string as buffer to the std::ostringstream.

However, a better solution would be to not insert the superfluous ',' in the first place, by doing something like that :

std::ostringstream douCoh;
const char* separator = "";

douCoh << '{';
for (size_t i = 0; i < dataSize; ++ i)
{
  if (v[i].test)
  {
    douCoh << separator << i + 1;
    separator = ",";
  }
}
douCoh << '}';
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Damn, you were faster by a few secs... –  RedX Dec 28 '10 at 14:01
    
nice;take it :) –  lord.didger Dec 29 '10 at 0:13

Have fun with std::copy, iterators and traits. You either have to assume that your data is reverse iterable (end - 1) or that your output can be rewinded. I choose it was easier to rewind.

#include <ostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

namespace My
{
  template<typename Iterator>
  void print(std::ostream &out, Iterator begin, Iterator end)
  {
    out << '{';
    if (begin != end) {
      Iterator last = end - 1;
      if (begin != last) {
        std::copy(begin, last, std::ostream_iterator< typename std::iterator_traits<Iterator>::value_type  >(out, ", "));
      }
      out << *last;
    }
    out << '}';
  }
}

#include <iostream>

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  My::print(std::cout, &argv[0], &argv[argc]);
  std::cout << '\n';
}
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Or else, you have to write the full loop instead of relying on std::copy. –  Benoît Dec 28 '10 at 23:53
stringstream douCoh;
for(unsigned int i=0;i<dataSize;i++)
  if(v[i].test)
    douCoh << ( douCoh.tellp()==0 ? '{' : ',' ) << i+1;
douCoh << '}';
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Welcome to StackOverflow! It would be useful if you explained your code for those that don't understand it. –  ajacian81 Nov 5 '12 at 0:07
    
+1. This is my personal favorite. –  kirbyfan64sos Aug 13 at 22:24

You could use std::string::erase to remove the last character directly from the underlying string.

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1  
How can I get the underlying string? str() returns a copy of string not a reference, doesn't it? –  lord.didger Dec 28 '10 at 13:39
    
Yes, you get a copy of the contents using str(). –  RedX Dec 28 '10 at 13:58
    
There is another override of the std::ostringstream::str function that allow to change the buffer. However, this solution cost two copy of the buffer content, which can be coslty. –  Sylvain Defresne Dec 28 '10 at 14:10

Why not just check the counter? And not insert the ','

douCoh << '{';
for(unsigned int i=0;i<dataSize;i++){
  if(v[i].test){
    douCoh << i+1;
    if(i != dataSize - 1) douCoh << ',';
  }
}
/*douCoh.get();*/ douCoh << '}';
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I think it is not possible to check the counter as there can be some objects that does not pass the test. Another counter is required (that can be a bool), or my trick of changing the separator variable can be used. –  Sylvain Defresne Dec 28 '10 at 14:08
    
It is impossible to predict value of v[j].test for j>i before the coditional. –  lord.didger Dec 28 '10 at 23:58

I've found this way using pop_back() string's method since c++11. Probably not so good as smarter ones above, but useful in much more complicated cases and/or for lazy people.

douCoh << '{';
for(unsigned int i=0;i<dataSize;i++)
  if(v[i].test) douCoh << i+1 << ',';

string foo(douCoh.str());
foo.pop_back();
douCoh.str(foo);
douCoh.seekp (0, douCoh.end);  

douCoh << '}';
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