Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can I ask what the difference is between string object slice() and substr() in JavaScript?

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

They have different signatures, .slice() is:

string.slice(beginIndex, endIndex)

Whereas .substr() is:

string.substr(beginIndex, length);

So for example, if we have "1234" and wanted "23", it would be:

"1234".slice(1,3)
//or...
"1234".substr(1,2)

They also have different behavior for the more-rarely used negative indexes, look at the MDC documentation for .slice() and .substr() for full descriptions.

share|improve this answer
2  
Note that the "substr" method is not a part of ECMAScript standard and also can give inconsistent results in different browsers. Here is good summary: jacklmoore.com/notes/substring-substr-slice-javascript –  C-F Jun 12 '13 at 2:54
add comment
  1. String.slice(begin, end)

    This method will cut text from begin to end char, eg.:

    alert("Hello World!".slice(1, 8)); // ello Wo
    
  2. String.substr(begin, length)

    This method will cut text from begin to begin + length char, eg.:

    alert("Hello World!".substr(1, 8)); // ello Wor
    
share|improve this answer
add comment
var str="Hello world!";
document.write(str.substring(3,7)+"<br />");
document.write(str.slice(3,7)+"<br />");
document.write(str.substr(3,7));

result:

lo w
lo w
lo worl
share|improve this answer
add comment

I think the difference between str.slice() and str.substr() is the second parameter:

.slice() takes EndIndex while .substr() takes length as in:

.slice(StartIndex,EndIndex) and .substr(StartIndex,length).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Substring()

1.If start equals stop, it returns an empty string. 2.If stop is omitted, it extracts characters to the end of the string. 3.If start > stop, then substring will swap those 2 arguments. 4.If either argument is greater than the string's length, either argument will use the string's length. 5.If either argument is less than 0 or is NaN, it is treated as if it were 0.

slice()

1.If start equals stop, it returns an empty string, exactly like substring(). 2.If stop is omitted, slice extracts chars to the end of the string, exactly like substring(). 3.If start > stop, slice() will NOT swap the 2 arguments. 4.If either argument is greater than the string's length, either argument will use the string's length, exactly like substring().

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.