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Framework: Spring, Hibernate. O/S: Windows

I am trying to implement hibernate's Custom message interpolator following the direction of this Link.

When implementing the below class, it gives an error "Cannot make a static reference to the non-static type Locale".

public class ClientLocaleThreadLocal<Locale> {
  private static ThreadLocal tLocal = new ThreadLocal();

  public static void set(Locale locale) {
    tLocal.set(locale);
  }

  public static Locale get() {
    return tLocal.get();
  }

  public static void remove() {
    tLocal.remove();
  } 

}

As I do not know generics enough, not sure how < Locale > is being used by TimeFilter class below and the purpose of definition in the above class.

public class TimerFilter implements Filter {
public void destroy() {
}

public void doFilter(ServletRequest req, ServletResponse res, FilterChain filterChain) throws IOException, ServletException {
    try {
        ClientLocaleThreadLocal.set(req.getLocale());       
        filterChain.doFilter(req, res);
    }finally {
        ClientLocaleThreadLocal.remove();
    }
}
public void init(FilterConfig arg0) throws ServletException {
}

}

Will doing the following be okay?

  1. Change static method/field in ClientLocaleThreadLocal to non-static method/fields

  2. In TimeFilter, set locale by instantiating new object as below. new ClientLocaleThreadLocal().set(req.getLocale())

Thanks for your help in advance

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
public class ClientLocaleThreadLocal<Locale>

declares a generic class ClientLocaleThreadLocal with a type parameter called Locale. Since the ClientLocaleThreadLocal always contains a Locale, there is no need for a type parameter here.

private static ThreadLocal tLocal = new ThreadLocal();

A ThreadLocal in contrast is a generic type, and has as type parameter the type of object it holds. In your case, this is Locale. Your code should therefore read:

public class ClientLocaleThreadLocal {
    private static ThreadLocal<Locale> tLocal = new ThreadLocal<Locale>();

As for what a ThreadLocal is, read its Javadoc or google its name.

Whether res.getLocale() is the "client locale" is something we can't know, since "client locale" is a little vague.

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Thanks! a lot Meriton. This helps me to take this forward. Just to clarify the statement 'Since the ClientLocaleThreadLocal always contains a Locale, there is no need for a type parameter here.' Do you mean 'always contains a ThreadLocal<Locale>'? –  Jayaprakash Dec 28 '10 at 16:03
    
Yes. The important point being that you want to refer to the class java.util.Locale, not declare a type parameter called Locale. –  meriton Dec 28 '10 at 16:11
    
Thanks! Meriton –  Jayaprakash Dec 28 '10 at 16:27
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"Locale" is a generic parameter here. This particular name is a little confusing, since it clashes with existing type names.

By convention, generic parameters are typically single letter capitals, like T, L, I, etc.

The specific error message you're getting:

Cannot make a static reference to the non-static type Locale

is because generic parameters at the class level can only be used in instance methods, not static methods. Think of this for a second. The generic parameter is normally supplied when you make a new instance of a class, but with static methods there never is an instance and thus no way to refer to the actual generic parameter.

E.g. to use the generic parameter you would use:

ClientLocaleThreadLocal<MyLocale> clt = new ClientLocaleThreadLocal<MyLocale>();
clt.set(someMyLocaleInstance);

But with static methods, you simply call this:

ClientLocaleThreadLocal.set(someMyLocaleInstance);

And as you see, the generic parameter has never been supplied.

The original JBoss example is thus not entirely correct.

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Thanks! Arjan for the clarification. –  Jayaprakash Dec 28 '10 at 15:35
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