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I am writing a SP, using PL/pgSQL.
I want to return a record, comprised of fields from several different tables. Could look something like this:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_object_fields(name text)
  RETURNS RECORD AS $$
BEGIN
  -- fetch fields f1, f2 and f3 from table t1
  -- fetch fields f4, f5 from table t2
  -- fetch fields f6, f7 and f8 from table t3
  -- return fields f1 ... f8 as a record
END
$$ language plpgsql; 

How may I return the fields from different tables as fields in a single record?

[Edit]

I have realized that the example I gave above was slightly too simplistic. Some of the fields I need to be retrieving, will be saved as separate rows in the database table being queried, but I want to return them in the 'flattened' record structure.

The code below should help illustrate further:

CREATE TABLE user (id int, school_id int, name varchar(32));

CREATE TYPE my_type (
  user1_id   int,
  user1_name varchar(32),
  user2_id   int,
  user2_name varchar(32)
);

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_two_users_from_school(schoolid int)
  RETURNS my_type AS $$
DECLARE
  result my_type;
  temp_result user;
BEGIN
  -- for purpose of this question assume 2 rows returned
  SELECT id, name INTO temp_result FROM user where school_id = schoolid LIMIT 2;
  -- Will the (pseudo)code below work?:
  result.user1_id := temp_result[0].id ;
  result.user1_name := temp_result[0].name ;
  result.user2_id := temp_result[1].id ;
  result.user2_name := temp_result[1].name ;
  return result ;
END
$$ language plpgsql
share|improve this question
    
Did investigate returning multiple records e.g. returns setof my_type –  nate c Dec 28 '10 at 21:01
    
@nate: its not the function that returns a set. I need to fetch records WITHIN the SP, and then retrieve fields from INDIVIDUAL records in the retrieved set, in the data returned from the function - sounnds more complicated than it actually is - see the code above –  skyeagle Dec 28 '10 at 22:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You need to define a new type and define your function to return that type.

CREATE TYPE my_type (f1 varchar(10), f2 varchar(10), ... );

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_object_fields(name text) 
RETURNS my_type 
AS 
$$

DECLARE
  result_record my_type;

BEGIN
  SELECT f1, f2, f3
  INTO result_record.f1, result_record.f2, result_record.f3
  FROM table1
  WHERE pk_col = 42;

  SELECT f3 
  INTO result_record.f3
  FROM table2
  WHERE pk_col = 24;

  RETURN result_record;

END
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql; 

If you want to return more than one record you need to define the function as returns setof my_type

share|improve this answer
    
Please see the modified question - it turns out the original question was too simplified for my actual needs. Thanks –  skyeagle Dec 28 '10 at 18:08
    
I'm not sure I understand the "new" problem, but it all boils down to finding the correct queries that retrieve the desired result. Once you have them, returning the result should not be a problem –  a_horse_with_no_name Dec 28 '10 at 18:56
    
The new problem is that I need to be able to offset into retrieved rows and fetch specific fields from the retrieved set, so that I can populate the 'flattened' structure that is returned from the SP. The new problem boils down to the following two questions: (1). what data type do I use to receive a set of rows from a query (2)> How do I access field "f1" of the Nth row in the returned set? –  skyeagle Dec 28 '10 at 23:02
    
I would suggest to open a new question for this. In a nutshell: for 1) you would use a cursor to iterate over the result and pick the ones you need, for 2) you keep a counter e.g. using row_number() that identifies the specific row. Or even better: only select that row. But all that will not change the signature of your function. It is enough to return the type you have specified. –  a_horse_with_no_name Dec 28 '10 at 23:28
    
Don't use a new TYPE to solve this problem. Just use a RECORD and alias the members in the RECORD. See stackoverflow.com/questions/4547672/… for a more correct answer that doesn't involve custom TYPEs. –  Sean Aug 3 '11 at 2:12

If you have a table with this exact record layout, use its name as a type, otherwise you will have to declare the type explicitly:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_object_fields
        (
        name text
        )
RETURNS mytable
AS
$$
        DECLARE f1 INT;
        DECLARE f2 INT;
        …
        DECLARE f8 INT;
        DECLARE retval mytable;
        BEGIN
        -- fetch fields f1, f2 and f3 from table t1
        -- fetch fields f4, f5 from table t2
        -- fetch fields f6, f7 and f8 from table t3
                retval := (f1, f2, …, f8);
                RETURN retval;
        END
$$ language plpgsql; 
share|improve this answer

Don't use CREATE TYPE to return a polymorphic result. Use and abuse the RECORD type instead. Check it out:

CREATE FUNCTION test_ret(a TEXT, b TEXT) RETURNS RECORD AS $$
DECLARE 
  ret RECORD;
BEGIN
  -- Arbitrary expression to change the first parameter
  IF LENGTH(a) < LENGTH(b) THEN
      SELECT TRUE, a || b, 'a shorter than b' INTO ret;
  ELSE
      SELECT FALSE, b || a INTO ret;
  END IF;
RETURN ret;
END;$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

Pay attention to the fact that it can optionally return two or three columns depending on the input.

test=> SELECT test_ret('foo','barbaz');
             test_ret             
----------------------------------
 (t,foobarbaz,"a shorter than b")
(1 row)

test=> SELECT test_ret('barbaz','foo');
             test_ret             
----------------------------------
 (f,foobarbaz)
(1 row)

This does wreak havoc on code, so do use a consistent number of columns, but it's ridiculously handy for returning optional error messages with the first parameter returning the success of the operation. Rewritten using a consistent number of columns:

CREATE FUNCTION test_ret(a TEXT, b TEXT) RETURNS RECORD AS $$
DECLARE 
  ret RECORD;
BEGIN
  -- Note the CASTING being done for the 2nd and 3rd elements of the RECORD
  IF LENGTH(a) < LENGTH(b) THEN
      ret := (TRUE, (a || b)::TEXT, 'a shorter than b'::TEXT);
  ELSE
      ret := (FALSE, (b || a)::TEXT, NULL::TEXT);
   END IF;
RETURN ret;
END;$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

Almost to epic hotness:

test=> SELECT test_ret('foobar','bar');
   test_ret    
----------------
 (f,barfoobar,)
(1 row)

test=> SELECT test_ret('foo','barbaz');
             test_ret             
----------------------------------
 (t,foobarbaz,"a shorter than b")
(1 row)

But how do you split that out in to multiple rows so that your ORM layer of choice can convert the values in to your language of choice's native data types? The hotness:

test=> SELECT a, b, c FROM test_ret('foo','barbaz') AS (a BOOL, b TEXT, c TEXT);
 a |     b     |        c         
---+-----------+------------------
 t | foobarbaz | a shorter than b
(1 row)

test=> SELECT a, b, c FROM test_ret('foobar','bar') AS (a BOOL, b TEXT, c TEXT);
 a |     b     | c 
---+-----------+---
 f | barfoobar | 
(1 row)

This is one of the coolest and most underused features in PostgreSQL. Please spread the word.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed handy.. I was wondering how to split this record again... Thanks! –  alfonx Feb 8 '12 at 22:38
    
@Sean: Great answer thanks -- I'm going to try this. And splitting out the results in the last example is very cool. –  SabreWolfy Jun 26 '12 at 12:18
    
@Sean: Thanks. I find the SELECT a, b, c ... very useful. How could I use that method with something like: SELECT code, theFunction(code) from theTable ;, where I am SELECTing from the table rather than the function? –  SabreWolfy Jun 29 '12 at 10:43
    
@SabreWolfy, you can't to the best of my knowledge unless you make theFunction a set-returning function. –  Sean Jul 1 '12 at 1:54
1  
@Sean: 1. Since Postgres 9.2, plain SQL statements are re-planned, too. Details here. 2. The return type is independent of EXECUTE or not. 3. The technique in the answer only works for single-row results not for SETOF record. 4. If your return type is constant anyway (like in your example), use a well known type. The idea with an anonymous record only makes sense in rare cases with varying return types. –  Erwin Brandstetter Feb 28 at 18:00

This can be simpler with OUT parameters:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_object_fields(
          name text
    ,OUT user1_id   int
    ,OUT user1_name varchar(32)
    ,OUT user2_id   int
    ,OUT user2_name varchar(32)
) AS 
$func$
BEGIN
    SELECT t.user1_id, t.user1_name
    INTO     user1_id,   user1_name
    FROM   tbl1 t
    WHERE  t.tbl1_id = 42;

    user2_id := user1_id + 43; -- some calculation

    SELECT t.user2_name
    INTO     user2_name
    FROM   tbl2 t
    WHERE  t.tbl2_i = user2_id;
END
$func$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
  • You don't need to create a type just for the sake of this plpgsql function. It may be useful if you want to bind a couple of functions to the same type. I rarely use it any more since OUT parameters were added.

  • As you may have noticed, there is no RETURN statement. OUT parameters are returned automatically, no RETURN statement necessary.

  • Since OUT parameters are visible everywhere inside the function body (and can be used just like any other variable), make sure to table-qualify columns of the same name to avoid naming conflicts.

Simpler yet - or return multiple rows

Most of the time this can be simplified further. Sometimes queries in the function body can be combined, which is usually (not always) faster. And you can use RETURNS TABLE() - introduced with Postgres 8.4 (long before this question was asked as well).

The example from above could be rewritten as:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_object_fields(name text)
  RETURNS TABLE (
     user1_id   int
    ,user1_name varchar(32)
    ,user2_id   int
    ,user2_name varchar(32)) AS 
$func$
BEGIN
    RETURN QUERY
    SELECT t1.user1_id, t1.user1_name, t2.user2_id, t2.user2_name
    FROM   tbl1 t1
    JOIN   tbl2 t2 ON t2.user2_id = t1.user1_id + 43
    WHERE  t1.tbl1_id = 42
    LIMIT  1;  -- may be optional
END
$func$ LANGUAGE plpgsql; 
  • RETURNS TABLE is effectively the same as having a bunch of OUT parameters combined with RETURNS record, just a bit shorter / more elegant.

  • The major difference is, that this function can return 0, 1 or many rows, while the first version always returns 1 row.
    If you want to make sure, this one returns just 0 or 1 row, add LIMIT 1 like demonstrated.

  • RETURN QUERY is the very handy modern way to return results from a query directly.
    You can use multiple instances in a single function to add more rows to the output.

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