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I have 2 classes: A and B. Some methods of class A need to use class B and the opposite(class B has methods that need to use class A).

So I have:

class A;

class B {

   method1(A a) {
   }

}

class A {

   method1(B b) {
   }

   void foo() {
   }
}

and everything works fine.

But when I try to call foo() of class A from B::method1 like this:

class B {

   method1(A a) {
      a.foo();
   }

}

I get as result compile errors of forward declaration and use of incomplete type. But why is this happening? (I have declared class A before using it?)

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4  
-1 for presenting invalid c++ code without indication. How can we know what you mean symbolical and what you mean serious? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 28 '10 at 17:42
2  
@Johannes Schaub - litb - Why down vote, when the user doesn't even know the process of posting on SO ? Been a member for today only. Ask him to clarify his problem properly and then down vote if he doesn't. –  DumbCoder Dec 28 '10 at 17:45
1  
@DumbCoder, no I will downvote first. Then when he fixes it, I will undo my downvote and possibly upvote it. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 28 '10 at 17:46
    
@Johannes Schaub - litb - So why not point him how to correct it atleast ? Without any pointers he maybe lost, while other user tag on your down vote and down vote him further. –  DumbCoder Dec 28 '10 at 17:49
2  
@John Fra: Are you sure that the code that you claim "everything works fine" actually compiles? If so, what compiler have you been using? –  Martin v. Löwis Dec 28 '10 at 17:52
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2 Answers

The compiler hasn't seen the definition of A at the point where you call A::foo(). You can't call a method for an incomplete type - i.e. a type for which the compiler doesn't yet know the definition of. You need to define the calling method after the compiler can see the definition of class A.

class A;

class B 
{
    public:
   void method1(A a);
};

class A 
{
    public:
   void method1(B b) { }

   void foo() { }
};

void B::method1(A a)
{
    a.foo();
}

In practice, you may want to place the definition for B::method1() in a separate cpp file, which has an #include for the header file containing class A.

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C++ INCLUDE Rule : Use forward declaration when possible.

  • B only uses references or pointers to A. Use forward declaration then : you don't need to include . This will in turn speed a little bit the compilation.

  • B derives from A or B explicitely (or implicitely) uses objects of class A. You then need to include

Source: http://www-subatech.in2p3.fr/~photons/subatech/soft/carnac/CPP-INC-1.shtml

For avoiding multiple inclusion of header files you should include a guard, to prevent the compiler from reading the definitions more that once:

#ifndef EMCQUEUE_HH
#define EMCQUEUE_HH
// rest of header file ...
// definition code here...
#endif

See Industrial Strength C++ Chapter Two: Organizing the code.

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