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Let's say trying to use django.views.generic.create_update.create_object to allow the user to a blog entry instance. On the Entry model, there is a required field for the user, that I don't want to show up as an editable field on the blog entry form. So, I would include it into the EntryForm.Meta.exclude tuple.

Where should I set the value for the user property on the resulting model instance? Would I have to stop using the create_object generic view and write my own?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't think you can accomplish this with generic views, they don't have much in the way of post-processing data. Thankfully, it isn't hard to write your own view to do the same thing.

(Adapted from http://www.djangobook.com/en/1.0/chapter07/)

from yourmodel.forms import EntryForm

def create_entry(request):
    if request.method == 'POST':
        form = EntryForm(request.POST)
        if form.is_valid():
            entry = form.save(commit = false)
            entry.author = request.user.username
            entry.save()
            return HttpResponseRedirect('/create_entry/thanks/')
    else:
        form = EntryForm()
    return render_to_response('/path/to/template.html', {'form' : form, ...}, ...)

Of course you'll have to use your own names and such, but that's the logic. Basically you're checking if a form has been submitted, and if so get the Entry, add in a username, and save it as usual. As far as differences from the generic create_object view are concerned, instead of specifying things such as the post_redirect_url in the view call, you give them directly. Check the docs of render_to_response and HttpResponseRedirect for more info.

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I just had to solve this problem, and didn't want to cheat. It wasn't hard. Check the below.

Please note that it's only this convoluted because I chose to adhere to my view of the MVC separation on this. The user population is view-specific (since we have no special initial user in Edit). The handling is model-specific.

It wouldn't be hard to extract a form mixin that expects a new "passthrough" parameter and automatically merges an exclude with a forwarding of initial data. This also adds the security of knowing nobody can modify those fields' data in the View.

class TestForm(forms.ModelForm):

    class Meta:
        exclude = ('user')
        model = models.Test

    def save(self, commit=True):
        obj = super(CharmForm, self).save(commit=False)
        obj.user = self.initial['user']

        if commit:
            obj.save()

class TestView(CreateView):
    model = models.Test
    form_class = TestForm
    def get_initial(self,**kwargs):
        initial = super(CreateView,self).get_initial()

        c = RequestContext(self.request)

        initial = initial.copy()
        initial['user'] = c['user']
        return initial

Also, not totally sure if you were trying to use the new Class-Based views. I'm actually answering this question for anyone with this problem (I had to hack code to find the answer because nobody else seems to have done it).

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There is one little problem with sykora's solution: if the form is invalid you will get an error because form won't be set (outside of the scope of the if statement).

Here's a slightly better version:

from yourmodel.forms import EntryForm

def create_entry(request):
    form = EntryForm()
    if request.method == 'POST':
        form = EntryForm(request.POST)
        if form.is_valid():
            entry = form.save(commit = false)
            entry.author = request.user.username
            entry.save()
            return HttpResponseRedirect('/create_entry/thanks/')
    return render_to_response('/path/to/template.html', {'form' : form, ...}, ...)
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