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I have created a table called table1 and it has 4 columns named Name,ID,Description and Date.

I have created them like Name varchar(50) null, ID int null,Description varchar(50) null, Date datetime null

I have inserted a record into the table1 having ID and Description values. So Now my table1 looks like this:

Name   ID   Description  Date

Null    1    First       Null

One of them asked me to modify the table such a way that The columns Name and Date should have Null values instead of Text Null. I don't know what is the difference between those

I mean can anyone explain me the difference between these select statements:

SELECT * FROM TABLE1 WHERE NAME IS NULL

SELECT * FROM TABLE1 WHERE NAME = 'NULL'

SELECT * FROM TABLE1 WHERE NAME = ' '

Can anyone explain me?

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2  
Who exactly asked you? The reason you see Null is that there is other way to represent a null value, the real value if there is no value should be a null value. –  Ramhound Dec 28 '10 at 19:25
    
DBA told me that the value in the table represents text null so can you change it to null value thats' what he asked me to do.Yes Ramhound Can you tell me how to represent a null value –  Sam Dec 28 '10 at 19:31
    
Sam, you have gotten some impressive help in this and previous questions. Does your DBA give you anything beside tasks? –  RC_Cleland Dec 29 '10 at 3:18

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In a CREATE TABLE, the NULL or NOT NULL here varchar(50) null is a constraint that determines whether NULLs are allowed. NOT NULL means no.

When you inserted data, which statement did you run?

INSERT TABLE1 VALUES (Null, 1, First, Null)

or

INSERT TABLE1 VALUES ('Null', 1, First, 'Null')
  • The first one uses the keyword NULL, inserts a NULL (not a null value: no such thing, arguably). No values is stored except in the NULL bitmap fields
  • The second one has a string "null" and the characters N, U, L, L + 2 bytes for length are stored

When you run SELECT * FROM TABLE1, client tools will show NULL.

To test whether you actually have NULLs or the string NULL, run this

SELECT ISNULL(name, 'fish'), ISNULL(date, GETDATE())  FROM TABLE1

For the SELECTs

--null symbols. No value stored
SELECT * FROM TABLE1 WHERE NAME IS NULL
--string null
SELECT * FROM TABLE1 WHERE NAME = 'NULL'
--empty string
SELECT * FROM TABLE1 WHERE NAME = ' '

Note: null symbol/value is not empty string. It has no value and won't compare. Even to itself.

As for your DBA, the code above with ISNULL will decide what is stored.

Edit: if you are storing null symbol/value, then your DBA should read up on "null bitmap"

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The data does represent nulls. The text 'Null' is your query tool displaying the text.

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One of them asked me to modify the table such a way that The columns Name and Date should have Null values instead of Text Null. I don't know what is the difference between those.

The NULL keyword indicates the absence of any value -- the value is unknown.

But that won't stop someone from storing the letters that spell out "NULL", data type providing (which INT and DATETIME will not). Because of this, operators like IS NULL would not work on text that spells out "NULL" and vice versa -- searching for strings using: ... LIKE '%NULL%' will not return records with NULL values.

The data type of the column does matter with regard to NULL in SQL Server. In a UNION statement, you need to cast NULL to be the appropriate data type -- the default for NULL is INT:

SELECT CAST('2011-01-01 00:00:00' AS DATETIME)
UNION
SELECT CAST(NULL AS DATETIME)

Based on the information provided about the columns and the output, the DBA appears to be asking you to change the text the client you are using to connect to SQL Server with displays when a NULL value is encountered in a resultset. Reminds me of my first job dishwashing, and was asked to get the lefthanded spatula...

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The string "Null" is a string.

The value of NULL (or Null or null, SQL is case-insensitive when it comes to these things) is used to denote an unknown value. It's the empty set of values, if you will.

http://www.w3schools.com/sql/sql_null_values.asp

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NULL, in software, is symbolic of no value. Assuming you're inserting the columns using a string with null as the value, use the null constant. e.g.

INSERT INTO table1 (Name,ID,Description,Date) VALUES (NULL,1,'First',NULL);

Note that NULL is a constant in SQL, not the word "NULL" in a string.

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3  
keyword, not "constant" –  gbn Dec 28 '10 at 19:28
    
@gbn: Technically, you're right. But given it doesn't change, keeping it conceptually a constant makes it easier, IMHO. [edited, referenced wrong manual] –  Brad Christie Dec 28 '10 at 19:58

AFAIC, there is no different between NULLs. There are different column types. But as long as a column is a text data type, and it's NULL, it's a text NULL.

Sometimes there are questions about empty strings ("") instead of NULLs, but the description you're using doesn't seem to be referring to that.

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SELECT * FROM TABLE1 WHERE NAME IS NULL

Returns all rows where the Name is NULL

SELECT * FROM TABLE1 WHERE NAME = 'NULL'

Returns all rows where the Name is equal to the string 'NULL', Null values are not returned

SELECT * FROM TABLE1 WHERE NAME = ' '

Returns all rows where the Name is equal to exactly one space ' ', Null values are not returned

If you run this statement it might help clear up when its null and when its not

select 
*,
case 
    WHEN name is null THEN  'Its Null alright' 
        ELSE 'It has a value'
END 
FROM TABLE1
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Now can you tell me out of these which has text as NULL and value as Null –  Sam Dec 28 '10 at 19:58
    
The second one returns rows with the literal text NULL. the first returns only null values –  Conrad Frix Dec 28 '10 at 20:01

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