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I am trying to learn inheritance and interface in Java. I have three different classes: Customer, SilverCustomer and GoldCustomer. Both SilverCustomer and GoldCustomer extend Customer.

In the application, the customer get points for traveling. Normal Customer gets the mileage they travel to points. SilverCustomer gets mileage * 1.5 and GoldCustomer gets mileage * 2 points.

When I create a normal Customer John, how can I switch between normal customer, silvercustomer and goldcustomer with a method downgrade() and upgrade()?

class Testfile {
     public static void main(String[] args) {

         Airline aProgram = new Airline();

         Customer john = new Customer("john", 10001); // 10001 is the id number and the status of a customer is normal

         aProgram.addMembers(john);

    john.update_mileage(12000);
    john.upgrade(); //upgrade John to SilverCustomer
    john.update_mileage(2000);

     aProgram.printAllCustomerMilege(); 
   }
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As already mentioned, the Strategy Design Pattern and not inheritance is the way to go. When using that pattern, you don't even need to create each (Normal, Silver, Gold) customer classes because the strategy can handle the downgrade and upgrade methods as well:

public interface MileageCalculator
{
    double getMileage(int miles);
    MileageCalculator upgrade();
    MileageCalculator downgrade();
}

public class NormalMileageCalculator implements MileageCalculator
{
    public double getMileage(int miles)
    {
        return miles;
    }

    MileageCalculator upgrade()
    {
        return new SilverMileageCalculator();
    }

    MileageCalculator downgrade()
    {
        return this;
    }
}

public class SilverMileageCalculator implements MileageCalculator
{
    public double getMileage(int miles)
    {
        return miles * 1.5;
    }

    MileageCalculator upgrade()
    {
        return new GoldMileageCalculator();
    }

    MileageCalculator downgrade()
    {
        return new SilverMileageCalculator();
    }
}

// The same for GoldMileageCalculator

class Customer
{
    private MileageCalculator calculator = new NormalMileageCalculator();
    private double mileage;

    public void upgrade()
    {
        calculator = this.calculator.upgrade();
    }

    public void downgrade()
    {
        calculator = this.calculator.downgrade();
    }

    public void update_mileage(int miles)
    {
        this.mileage += calculator.getMileage(miles);
    }
}
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Thanks Daff, helped me a lot. –  Tibbo Dec 30 '10 at 6:44

You can't change the class of an object once it's been created.

If your logic depends on the type of your customer, you can use Strategy design pattern. In your example you can write something like this:


interface Strategy {
    double getMileageCoefficient();
}
class NormalCustomerStrategy implements Strategy {
    public double getMileageCoefficient() {
        return 1.0;
    }
}
class GoldCustomerStrategy implements Strategy {
    public double getMileageCoefficient() {
        return 2.0;
    }
}

In your Customer class there will be a private field Strategy strategy; Then your upgrade method will look like this:


void upgrade() {
    this.strategy = new GoldCustomerStrategy();
}

And the upgradeMileage method:


void upgradeMileage(double mileage) {
    this.mileage += strategy.getMileageCoefficient() * mileage;
}

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1  
That's the type of solution I would suggest. But I'd try to use a more semantically meaningful name "MembershipType" instead of "Strategy". –  Carles Barrobés Dec 28 '10 at 20:20
    
@Carles Yep, or the variant @daff gave in his answer. (Besides, it's more general and easier to refactor if, for instance, the formula becomes nonlinear.) I just wrote something quick and dirty as an illustration. –  adamax Dec 28 '10 at 20:46
    
Thanks for a good example. I like both yours and Daff's example –  Tibbo Dec 30 '10 at 6:44

Your inheritance structure assumes a Customer will never change type. The only way to "change" the type is to remove the old Customer object and create a new one.

A better approach is to have one Customer class and have a CustomerType field which can be changed.

enum CustomerType {
    Standard(1.0), Silver(1.5), Gold(2.0);
    final double pointsRate;
    public CustomerType(double pointsRate) { this.pointsRate = pointsRate; }
}

class Customer {
    CustomerType customerType;

    public void upgrade() {
        switch(customerType) {
            case Standard: customerType = CustomerType.Silver; break;
            case Silver: customerType = CustomerType.Gold; break;
        }
    }
}
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It sounds like this shouldn't be implemented in inheritance. If your customers can be "upgraded" or "downgraded", then the is-a relationship doesn't really hold. Inheritence should be used when an object is INHERENTLY different from its parent.

For example, a class dog extends animal is-a class animal. You wouldn't say you could "upgrade" a dog to an animal, because a dog IS an animal.

As to your question, what you should do is just have a member variable "type" where you store the type of customer he is (regular, silver, gold).

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This is the case where inheritance is not a solution. I would recommend a single Customer class with a type field that holds an enum.

If you would still like to do this with inheritance, then the only way to do this is to copy your data to a new object. Perhaps the upgrade() method can return a new object. You then have to update your references (such as in a list) to point to the new object.

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