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Say you need to have a list/array of integers which you need iterate frequently, and I mean extremely often. The reasons may vary, but say it's in the heart of the inner most loop of a high volume processing.

In general, one would opt for using Lists (List) due to their flexibility in size. On top of that, msdn documentation claims Lists use an array internally and should perform just as fast (a quick look with Reflector confirms this). Neverless, there is some overhead involved.

Did anyone actually measure this? would iterating 6M times through a list take the same time as an array would?

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26  
OK, I think you deserve a badge for correcting a typo in a 5-month old question ;-p –  Marc Gravell Jun 28 '09 at 8:51
    
Performance issues aside, I prefer usage of Arrays over Lists for their fixed size (in cases where changing the number of items is not required, of course). When reading existing code, I find it helpful to quickly know that an item is forced to have fixed size, rather than having to inspect the code further down in the function. –  Warren Stevens Mar 30 '14 at 16:59

7 Answers 7

up vote 106 down vote accepted

Very easy to measure...

In a small number of tight-loop processing code where I know the length is fixed I use arrays for that extra tiny bit of micro-optimisation; arrays can be marginally faster if you use the indexer / for form - but IIRC believe it depends on the type of data in the array. But unless you need to micro-optimise, keep it simple and use List<T> etc.

Of course, this only applies if you are reading all of the data; a dictionary would be quicker for key-based lookups.

Here's my results using "int" (the second number is a checksum to verify they all did the same work):

(edited to fix bug)

List/for: 1971ms (589725196)
Array/for: 1864ms (589725196)
List/foreach: 3054ms (589725196)
Array/foreach: 1860ms (589725196)

based on the test rig:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
static class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        List<int> list = new List<int>(6000000);
        Random rand = new Random(12345);
        for (int i = 0; i < 6000000; i++)
        {
            list.Add(rand.Next(5000));
        }
        int[] arr = list.ToArray();

        int chk = 0;
        Stopwatch watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int rpt = 0; rpt < 100; rpt++)
        {
            int len = list.Count;
            for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
            {
                chk += list[i];
            }
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("List/for: {0}ms ({1})", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds, chk);

        chk = 0;
        watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int rpt = 0; rpt < 100; rpt++)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < arr.Length; i++)
            {
                chk += arr[i];
            }
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Array/for: {0}ms ({1})", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds, chk);

        chk = 0;
        watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int rpt = 0; rpt < 100; rpt++)
        {
            foreach (int i in list)
            {
                chk += i;
            }
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("List/foreach: {0}ms ({1})", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds, chk);

        chk = 0;
        watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int rpt = 0; rpt < 100; rpt++)
        {
            foreach (int i in arr)
            {
                chk += i;
            }
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Array/foreach: {0}ms ({1})", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds, chk);

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
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I was doing like exactly the same thing :) –  Frederik Gheysels Jan 18 '09 at 10:34
3  
Interesting detail: Here's the times RELEASE/DEBUG on my rig (.net 3.5 sp1): 0.92, 0.80, 0.96, 0.93; which tells me that there is some intelligence in the VM to optimize the Array/for loop approximately 10% better than the other cases. –  David Schmitt Jan 18 '09 at 11:06
    
Yes, there is JIT optimisation for array/for. Actually, I was under the impression that it included the Length case (since it knows it is fixed), hence why I didn't pull it out first (unlike List where I did). Thanks for the update. –  Marc Gravell Jan 18 '09 at 11:25
4  
Unfortunately I think this answer is misleading. It implies that arrays are 5% faster when it's more like 200-300%. See comment above, as well as msmvps.com/blogs/jon_skeet/archive/2009/01/29/… –  Jon Jan 2 '14 at 4:43
2  
The link mentioned in the above comment by Jon to Jon Skeet's blog was broken. Below is the updated link. codeblog.jonskeet.uk/2009/01/29/… –  hype8912 Oct 20 '14 at 13:54

I think the performance will be quite similar. The overhead that is involved when using a List vs an Array is, IMHO when you add items to the list, and when the list has to increase the size of the array that it's using internally, when the capacity of the array is reached.

Suppose you have a List with a Capacity of 10, then the List will increase it's capacity once you want to add the 11th element. You can decrease the performance impact by initializing the Capacity of the list to the number of items it will hold.

But, in order to figure out if iterating over a List is as fast as iterating over an array, why don't you benchmark it ?

int numberOfElements = 6000000;

List<int> theList = new List<int> (numberOfElements);
int[] theArray = new int[numberOfElements];

for( int i = 0; i < numberOfElements; i++ )
{
    theList.Add (i);
    theArray[i] = i;
}

Stopwatch chrono = new Stopwatch ();

chrono.Start ();

int j;

 for( int i = 0; i < numberOfElements; i++ )
 {
     j = theList[i];
 }

 chrono.Stop ();
 Console.WriteLine (String.Format("iterating the List took {0} msec", chrono.ElapsedMilliseconds));

 chrono.Reset();

 chrono.Start();

 for( int i = 0; i < numberOfElements; i++ )
 {
     j = theArray[i];
 }

 chrono.Stop ();
 Console.WriteLine (String.Format("iterating the array took {0} msec", chrono.ElapsedMilliseconds));

 Console.ReadLine();

On my system; iterating over the array took 33msec; iterating over the list took 66msec.

To be honest, I didn't expect that the variation would be that much. So, I've put my iteration in a loop: now, I execute both iteration 1000 times. The results are:

iterating the List took 67146 msec iterating the array took 40821 msec

Now, the variation is not that large anymore, but still ...

Therefore, I've started up .NET Reflector, and the getter of the indexer of the List class, looks like this:

public T get_Item(int index)
{
    if (index >= this._size)
    {
        ThrowHelper.ThrowArgumentOutOfRangeException();
    }
    return this._items[index];
}

As you can see, when you use the indexer of the List, the List performs a check whether you're not going out of the bounds of the internal array. This additional check comes with a cost.

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Hi Frederik, Thanks! How would you explain that your list took double the time of the arrays. Not what you would expect. Did you try to increase the number of elements? –  Boaz Jan 18 '09 at 10:46
    
Wouldn't return this._items[index]; already throw an exception if the index was out of range? Why does .NET have this extra check when the end result is the same with or without it? –  John Mercier May 7 at 12:03

if you are just getting a single value out of either (not in a loop) then both do bounds checking (you're in managed code remember) it's just the list does it twice. See the notes later for why this is likely not a big deal.

If you are using your own for(int int i = 0; i < x.[Length/Count];i++) then the key difference is as follows:

  • Array:
    • bounds checking is removed
  • Lists
    • bounds checking is performed

If you are using foreach then the key difference is as follows:

  • Array:
    • no object is allocated to manage the iteration
    • bounds checking is removed
  • List via a variable known to be List.
    • the iteration management variable is stack allocated
    • bounds checking is performed
  • List via a variable known to be IList.
    • the iteration management variable is heap allocated
    • bounds checking is performed also Lists values may not be altered during the foreach whereas the array's can be.

The bounds checking is often no big deal (especially if you are on a cpu with a deep pipeline and branch prediction - the norm for most these days) but only your own profiling can tell you if that is an issue. If you are in parts of your code where you are avoiding heap allocations (good examples are libraries or in hashcode implementations) then ensuring the variable is typed as List not IList will avoid that pitfall. As always profile if it matters.

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[See also this question]

I've modified Marc's answer to use actual random numbers and actually do the same work in all cases.

Results:

         for      foreach
Array : 1575ms     1575ms (+0%)
List  : 1630ms     2627ms (+61%)
         (+3%)     (+67%)

(Checksum: -1000038876)

Compiled as Release under VS 2008 SP1. Running without debugging on a Q6600@2.40GHz, .NET 3.5 SP1.

Code:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<int> list = new List<int>(6000000);
        Random rand = new Random(1);
        for (int i = 0; i < 6000000; i++)
        {
            list.Add(rand.Next());
        }
        int[] arr = list.ToArray();

        int chk = 0;
        Stopwatch watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int rpt = 0; rpt < 100; rpt++)
        {
            int len = list.Count;
            for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
            {
                chk += list[i];
            }
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("List/for: {0}ms ({1})", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds, chk);

        chk = 0;
        watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int rpt = 0; rpt < 100; rpt++)
        {
            int len = arr.Length;
            for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
            {
                chk += arr[i];
            }
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Array/for: {0}ms ({1})", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds, chk);

        chk = 0;
        watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int rpt = 0; rpt < 100; rpt++)
        {
            foreach (int i in list)
            {
                chk += i;
            }
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("List/foreach: {0}ms ({1})", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds, chk);

        chk = 0;
        watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int rpt = 0; rpt < 100; rpt++)
        {
            foreach (int i in arr)
            {
                chk += i;
            }
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Array/foreach: {0}ms ({1})", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds, chk);
        Console.WriteLine();

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
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That's weird - I've just run your exact code, built from the command line (3.5SP1) with /o+ /debug- and my results are: list/for: 1524; array/for: 1472; list/foreach:4128; array/foreach:1484. –  Jon Skeet Jan 23 '09 at 9:26
    
You say this was compiled as release - can I just check that you did run it rather than debugging it? Silly question, I know, but I can't explain the results otherwise... –  Jon Skeet Jan 26 '09 at 7:30
    
d'oh, indeed. Fixed my post. –  David Schmitt Jan 26 '09 at 10:24

The measurements are nice, but you are going to get significantly different results depending on what you're doing exactly in your inner loop. Measure your own situation. If you're using multi-threading, that alone is a non-trivial activity.

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Indeed, if you perform some complex calculations inside the loop, then the performance of the array indexer versus the list indexer may be so marginally small, that eventually, it doesn't matter.

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Since List<> uses arrays internally, the basic performance should be the same. Two reasons, why the List might be slightly slower:

  • To look up a element in the list, a method of List is called, which does the look up in the underlying array. So you need an additional method call there. On the other hand the compiler might recognize this and optimize the "unnecessary" call away.
  • The compiler might do some special optimizations if it knows the size of the array, that it can't do for a list of unknown length. This might bring some performance improvement if you only have a few elements in your list.

To check if it makes any difference for you, it's probably best adjust the posted timing functions to a list of the size you're planning to use and see how the results for your special case are.

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