Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table story_category in my database with corrupt entries. The next query returns the corrupt entries:

SELECT * FROM  story_category WHERE category_id NOT IN (
SELECT DISTINCT category.id FROM category INNER JOIN 
       story_category ON category_id=category.id);

I tried to delete them excuting:

DELETE FROM  story_category WHERE category_id NOT IN (
SELECT DISTINCT category.id FROM category 
       INNER JOIN story_category ON category_id=category.id);

but I get the next error:

#1093 - You can't specify target table 'story_category' for update in FROM clause

How can I overcome this?

share|improve this question
    

10 Answers 10

up vote 247 down vote accepted

Update: This answer covers the general error classification. For a more specific answer about how to best handle the OP's exact query, please see DanDarc's answer

In MySQL, you can't modify the same table which you use in the SELECT part.
This behaviour is documented at: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/update.html

You will need to stop using the nested subquery and execute the operation in two parts, or alternatively use a simple where clause.

Below is from Baron Schwartz, published at Nabble:

However, you can do multi-table updates like this:

UPDATE tbl AS a
  INNER JOIN tbl AS b ON ....
  SET a.col = b.col

If you absolutely need the subquery, there's a workaround, but it's ugly for several reasons, including performance:

UPDATE tbl SET col = (
  SELECT ... FROM (SELECT.... FROM) AS x);

The nested subquery in the FROM clause creates an implicit temporary table, so it doesn't count as the same table you're updating.

share|improve this answer
5  
Could have just saved myself half an hour of angst if I'd read this first. –  nedlud Jul 12 '11 at 1:45
    
Upvoted this answer because I had to delete items and could not get info from another table, had to subquery from same table. Since this is what pops up on top while googling for the error I got this would be the best fit answer for me and a lot of people trying to update while subquerieing from the same table. –  HMR Dec 12 '12 at 3:36
3  
The temp table might be ugly, but it gets the job done. +1 –  Chris Mar 6 '13 at 20:59
    
Thanks for providing the ideal answer AND the quick and dirty answer. –  arlomedia Apr 23 '13 at 3:37

The inner join in your subquery is unnecessary. It looks like you want to delete the entries in story_category where the category_id is not in the category table.

Do this:

DELETE FROM  story_category WHERE category_id NOT IN (SELECT DISTINCT
category.id FROM category);

Instead of that:

DELETE FROM  story_category WHERE category_id NOT IN (SELECT DISTINCT
category.id FROM category INNER JOIN
story_category ON
category_id=category.id);
share|improve this answer
2  
This should be the top answer! Maybe delete the first "instead of". –  hoyhoy Sep 7 '10 at 17:35
    
and fix the code block –  hoyhoy Sep 7 '10 at 17:35

NexusRex provided a very good solution for deleting with join from the same table.

If you do this:

DELETE FROM story_category
WHERE category_id NOT IN (
        SELECT DISTINCT category.id AS cid FROM category 
        INNER JOIN story_category ON category_id=category.id
)

you a going to get an error.

But if you wrap the condition in one more select

DELETE FROM story_category
WHERE category_id NOT IN (
    SELECT cid FROM (
        SELECT DISTINCT category.id AS cid FROM category 
        INNER JOIN story_category ON category_id=category.id
    ) AS c
)

it would do the right thing!!

share|improve this answer
    
+1 clean and logical approach. –  d.raev Oct 25 '13 at 7:27

Recently i had to update records in the same table i did it like below:

UPDATE skills AS s, (SELECT id  FROM skills WHERE type = 'Programming') AS p
SET s.type = 'Development' 
WHERE s.id = p.id;
share|improve this answer
2  
Easiest to understand answer on here. Thanks! –  Jim Beam Jan 28 '13 at 2:14
2  
Amazing! So, read all answers is a good practice! Thanks. –  Adrian P. Mar 19 at 14:20
1  
Not sure why this doesn't have more up votes thanks! –  MrB Apr 18 at 5:31
1  
Can't this just be written as UPDATE skills SET type='Development' WHERE type='Programming'; ? This doesn't seem to be answering the original question. –  lilbyrdie May 30 at 15:23

This is what I did for updating a Priority column value by 1 if it is >=1 in a table and in its WHERE clause using a subquery on same table to make sure that at least one row contains Priority=1 (because that was the condition to be checked while performing update) :


UPDATE My_Table
SET Priority=Priority + 1
WHERE Priority >= 1
AND (SELECT TRUE FROM (SELECT * FROM My_Table WHERE Priority=1 LIMIT 1) as t);

I know it's a bit ugly but it does works fine.

share|improve this answer
    
@anonymous_reviewer: In case of giving [-1] or even [+1] to someone's comment please also mention why have you given it. Thanks!!! –  sactiw Dec 20 '10 at 16:42
    
-1 because this is incorrect. You can't modify the same table that you use in the SELECT statement. –  Chris Jan 27 '11 at 20:10
    
@Chris I have verified it on MySQL and it works just fine for me so I would request you to please verify it at your end and then claim it to be correct or incorrect. Thanks!!! –  sactiw Feb 18 '11 at 15:03
    
At the bottom of this page it says 'Currently, you cannot update a table and select from the same table in a subquery.' - and I have experienced this to be true on many occasions. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/update.html –  Chris Feb 19 '11 at 0:08
12  
@Chris I know that, but there is a workaround for that and which is exactly what I have tried to show with my 'UPDATE' query and believe me it works just fine. I don't think you have really tried to verify my query at all. –  sactiw Feb 21 '11 at 13:39
DELETE FROM story_category
WHERE category_id NOT IN (
    SELECT cid FROM (
        SELECT DISTINCT category.id AS cid FROM category INNER JOIN story_category ON category_id=category.id
    ) AS c
)
share|improve this answer

You could insert the desired rows' ids into a temp table and then delete all the rows that are found in that table.

which may be what @Cheekysoft meant by doing it in two steps.

share|improve this answer

If something does not work, when coming thru the front-door, then take the back-door:

drop table if exists apples;
create table if not exists apples(variety char(10) primary key, price int);

insert into apples values('fuji', 5), ('gala', 6);

drop table if exists apples_new;
create table if not exists apples_new like apples;
insert into apples_new select * from apples;

update apples_new
    set price = (select price from apples where variety = 'gala')
    where variety = 'fuji';
rename table apples to apples_orig;
rename table apples_new to apples;
drop table apples_orig;

It's fast. The bigger the data, the better.

share|improve this answer

Whenever you can go round a join, then do so. Even if you sometimes need to denormalize your schema, then do so...

share|improve this answer
2  
Could you please explain why you think this? –  ridecar2 Feb 13 '12 at 16:39

protected by Community Feb 7 '13 at 12:05

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.