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i have this piece of code

int main()
{
    char a[100];
    a[0]='a';
    a[1]='b';
    fun(a[0]);
}

void fun(char *a)
{
    printf("%c",a);
}

but im passing a character to a pointer.will the pointer not be expecting an address???

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You essentially are sending an address. –  Falmarri Dec 28 '10 at 20:57
    
Yes, this might "work anyway", but only because it got lucky. Better to focus on the right way to do things than why things sometimes end up working despite mistakes. –  aschepler Dec 28 '10 at 21:05
    
yeah .iwas just going thru a set of code snippets and wanted to know the o/p actually :) –  karthik A Dec 28 '10 at 21:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

a[0] holds the value 97 ('a' in ASCII). fun will receive the value 97 in a but interpret it as an address. However, since you're only passing it to printf, and happen to incorrectly be using the %c formatter which will interpret a as a char, you'll end up printing a anyway.

Of course, on most compilers you should receive warnings that:

  1. You are converting an integer into a pointer (when you call fun) without casting it to a pointer.
  2. The %c formatter in printf should take a char, not a char *.
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You're calling a function which has no prototype at the point of the call. C89 says this is allowed, but it's your problem to ensure that the function is called with arguments that are correct for the parameters it is eventually defined with. Since they don't match in this case, undefined behavior.

Turn on more compiler warnings (-Wall in the case of gcc).

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the output i get is a.?? a[0] doest refer to an addrees does it? –  karthik A Dec 28 '10 at 21:00
    
@karthik: correct, a[0] is a char, with value 97. 97 can potentially be interpreted as an address, although there are no grounds to expect it to be a valid one. Behavior is undefined, so your implementation is permitted to print a. The calling convention has resulted in a value of 97 being passed in a way that allows printf to pick up that value and use it as a character because of the %c format. But you're not entitled to rely on that happening, it's just what happened with your particular compiler, compiler options, and weather. –  Steve Jessop Dec 28 '10 at 21:10

You're not passing a character to a pointer.

fun() is expecting a pointer to a character, but you're passing a character. This should generate a syntax error. Or, at the very least, not work right if you really haven't declared the function fun().

Characters are integer types that are copied on assignment.

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thts what i expected but the o/p comes to be 'a'. i tried on GCC –  karthik A Dec 28 '10 at 21:02
    
I can't determine why that would be without running it through a debugger. But a[0] is not a pointer. (Note that a + 0 or just a is a pointer.) –  Jonathan Wood Dec 28 '10 at 21:05

Solution 1: Don't use a pointer.

void fun(char a);

Solution 2: If you need to use a pointer for some reason not obvious here, use & to get a pointer and * to dereference the pointer.

void fun(char *a);
int main()
{
    char a[100];
    a[0]='a';
    a[1]='b';
    fun(&a[0]);
}

void fun(char *a)
{
    printf("%c",*a);
}  
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