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Turned out it was a simple constructor miss-use problem. Please see the "edit" section for the updated information.

Sorry for yet another C++ dtor question... However I can't seem to find one exactly like mine as all the others are assigning to STL containers (that will delete objects itself) whereas mine is to an array of pointers.

So I have the following code fragment

#include<iostream>

class Block{
public:
    int x, y, z;
    int type;
    Block(){
        x=1;
        y=2;
        z=3;
        type=-1;
    }
};

template <class T> class Octree{
    T* children[8];
public:
    ~Octree(){
        for( int i=0; i<8; i++){
            std::cout << "del:" << i << std::endl;
            delete children[i];
        }
    }    
    Octree(){
        for( int i=0; i<8; i++ )
            children[i] = new T;
    }
    // place newchild in array at [i]
    void set_child(int i, T* newchild){
        children[i] = newchild;
    }
    // return child at [i]
    T* get_child(int i){
        return children[i];
    }
    // place newchild at [i] and return the old [i]
    T* swap_child(int i, T* newchild){
        T* p = children[i];
        children[i] = newchild;
        return p;
    }
};

int main(){
    Octree< Octree<Block> > here;
    std::cout << "nothing seems to have broken" << std::endl;
}

Looking through the output I notice that the destructor is being called many times before I think it should (as Octree is still in scope), the end of the output also shows:

del:0
del:0
del:1
del:2
del:3

Process returned -1073741819 (0xC0000005)   execution time : 1.685 s
Press any key to continue.

For some reason the destructor is going through the same point in the loop twice (0) and then dying.

All of this occures before the "nothing seems to have gone wrong" line which I expected before any dtor was called.

Thanks in advance :)

EDIT The code I posted has some things removed that I thought were unnecessary but after copying and compiling the code I pasted I no longer get the error. What I removed was other integer attributes of the code. Here is the origional:

#include<iostream>

class Block{
public:
    int x, y, z;
    int type;
    Block(){
        x=1;
        y=2;
        z=3;
        type=-1;
    }
    Block(int xx, int yy, int zz, int ty){
        x=xx;
        y=yy;
        z=zz;
        type=ty;
    }
    Block(int xx, int yy, int zz){
        x=xx;
        y=yy;
        z=zz;
        type=0;
    }
};

template <class T> class Octree{
    int x, y, z;
    int size;
    T* children[8];
public:
    ~Octree(){
        for( int i=0; i<8; i++){
            std::cout << "del:" << i << std::endl;
            delete children[i];
        }
    }

    Octree(int xx, int yy, int zz, int size){
        x=xx;
        y=yy;
        z=zz;
        size=size;
        for( int i=0; i<8; i++ )
            children[i] = new T;
    }
    Octree(){
        Octree(0, 0, 0, 10);
    }
    // place newchild in array at [i]
    void set_child(int i, T* newchild){
        children[i] = newchild;
    }
    // return child at [i]
    T* get_child(int i){
        return children[i];
    }
    // place newchild at [i] and return the old [i]
    T* swap_child(int i, T* newchild){
        T* p = children[i];
        children[i] = newchild;
        return p;
    }
};

int main(){
    Octree< Octree<Block> > here;
    std::cout << "nothing seems to have broken" << std::endl;
}

Also, as for the problems with set_child, get_child and swap_child leading to possible memory leaks this will be solved as a wrapper class will either use get before set or use swap to get the old child and write this out to disk before freeing the memory itself.

I am glad that it is not my memory management failing but rather another error. I have not made a copy and/or assignment operator yet as I was just testing the block tree out, I will almost certainly make them all private very soon.

This version spits out -1073741819.

Thank you all for your suggestions and I apologise for highjacking my own thread :$

SOLVED Issue with one constructor calling another.

Thanks all for your help and apologies for any time wasted :)

share|improve this question
3  
Among other things, you have some major memory leaks; for example: children[i] = newchild;. Have you considered using a resource-owning smart pointer like auto_ptr or shared_ptr? –  James McNellis Dec 28 '10 at 22:21
    
It's easy to calculate that when destroying Octree< Octree<Block> > here; del= ... will be printed 64 times. Now, what's the question? –  Gene Bushuyev Dec 28 '10 at 22:37
3  
    
Works for me. What is the actual problem? Note (I expected del to be printed 72 times and I got 72 (8*8 + 8) quick glance shows they seem to be in the correct order). –  Loki Astari Dec 28 '10 at 22:51
    
Sorry about that, I removed some other integer attributes of Block and Octree and the error seems to stem from them, my full code is now after 'edit' in my origional post, very sorry about this. –  cjh Dec 29 '10 at 3:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is with the default constructor (which you didn't add until the edit!); it constructs a temporary Octree instance, where I expect you thought it would simply call the other constructor:

Octree(){
    Octree(0, 0, 0, 10);
}

It is this instance that you see being destructed before the crash. You then try to delete some children that were never newed (or initialised).

Extracting the initialisation code from Octree(int, int, int, int ) into a method will solve your problem. For example:

Octree(int xx, int yy, int zz, int size){
    init(xx, yy, zz, size);
}
Octree(){
    init(0, 0, 0, 10);
}

void init(int xx, int yy, int zz, int)
{
    x=xx;
    y=yy;
    z=zz;
    for( int i=0; i<8; i++ )
        children[i] = new T;

}

Alternatively, remove your default constructor and add default values to each of the arguments to your remaining constructor:

Octree(int xx = 0, int yy = 0, int zz = 0, int size = 10)
    :x(xx)
    ,y(yy)
    ,z(zz)
    ,size(size)
{
    for( int i=0; i<8; i++ )
        children[i] = new T;
}

However, do you really, really need to be handling raw pointers? If you do, then you'll almost certainly need to do something about copying before your class is useful.

In answer to your next question, "Nope!" "not until C++11!"

In (and its successors):

You can now delegate the construction, but the syntax is a little different to how you tried to express this:

Octree()
    :Octree(0, 0, 0, 10)
{
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for that Johnsyweb, that was exactly my problem and I am rather embarrased it was that >.> all that playing with interpreted languages and/or java coming through. –  cjh Dec 29 '10 at 3:57

Someone defined a constructor and destructor but no copy constructor. It's the copies being destroyed that mess up the count. Follow the rule of three.

share|improve this answer
4  
Note that I don't actually see any copies going on here, but failure to follow the rule of three is bound to be trouble. –  Ben Voigt Dec 28 '10 at 22:24
1  
It's not that I think that this is bad advice, but I just don't think that the OP's problem is caused by this, as he doesn't invoke any functions except the constructor and destructor. –  Puppy Dec 28 '10 at 22:42

It's not going through the same loop twice. Your top level Octtree has 8 child Octrees, so you are seeing nested destruction. I'm not sure why it is dying though.

share|improve this answer

I suspect that you simply finished destructing and the program terminated before all the output was written to console. It's expected that the thing goes through 0 twice as it's the Octree<> 0 and then the Octree<Octree<>> 0.

You need to change your code to guarantee that the destructors run, AND that all the console I/O is done before process exit.

int main(){
 {
  Octree< Octree<Block> > here;
 }
 std::cout << "nothing seems to have broken" << std::endl;
 std::cin.get();
}

Of course, this code has plenty of OTHER flaws. But I'll start with the exact problem presented.

share|improve this answer
1  
The process exiting with the negative return code is an indicator, and buffers are flushed to console on normal process exit on every platform of which I am aware. The destructors are guaranteed to run so long as no undefined behavior is going on. –  Billy ONeal Dec 28 '10 at 22:37
1  
@Billy: The code also produces expected results on my P&C- nothing fishy at all, and there's no problems that I can see in functions that he actually invokes. I don't actually have any other ideas. I didn't meant to imply that the destructors didn't run, but that he didn't give himself the ability to examine the output. 0xC0000005 is AV on Windows, but I don't see how he can have caused one. –  Puppy Dec 28 '10 at 22:38
    
My updated post's code produces unexpected output to the console as the double 0 is towards the end where in the working (origional code) it is at the begining. Also "nothing seems to have gone wrong" is not printed in my updated code at all. My origional post's code produces the results I was expecting to see. –  cjh Dec 29 '10 at 3:20

valgrind said:

==11907== HEAP SUMMARY:
==11907==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==11907==   total heap usage: 72 allocs, 72 frees, 1,536 bytes allocated
==11907== 
==11907== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
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