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I'm using jQuery to check to see if a username is taken. My issue is that $.post seems to escape anything. For example, I use this:

$.post("http://mywebsite.com/check_username.php", {
    "username": $("#username_txt").val()
}, function(data, textstatus, xmlhttp){
    // do stuff
});

to send the username to the page check_username.php, which is roughly,

$username = mysql_real_escape_string($_POST["username"]);
echo $username; // show the perceived username
echo mysql_query("SELECT * FROM users WHERE username=\"".$username."\";") === false ? 1 : 0;

If the username in the input field is "bob" (with the quotation marks), the return from the data will be \\\"bob\\\"0. Without the mysql_real_escape_string, it reads \"bob\". If I dare to leave it like that, then potential attackers could easily inject SQL code into my application.

I haven't seen anything on the jQuery documentation on get and post about this, so I'm not sure how to stop this. Barring not using jQuery for my ajax, how do I fix this?

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So you're saying bob works, but if someone enters "bob" it doesn't?...isn't that a user issue? –  Nick Craver Dec 28 '10 at 22:31
    
What do you mean by a user issue? I'm fine with quotation marks being used in usernames, but I want to escape them correctly. After all, it would be a shame if they actually had to log in using the name, \"bob\" when they signed up with the name, "bob" –  Waleed Khan Dec 28 '10 at 22:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You'll have to strip out the magic quotes that PHP automatically adds to $_GET, $_POST, and $_COOKIE data. That deprecated feature can be disabled if all your PHP code properly escapes strings before inserting them into HTML, SQL, command lines, etc.

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So, can I just leave out the mysql_real_escape_string and not worry about SQL injection? –  Waleed Khan Dec 28 '10 at 22:38
    
@arxanas: See scoates's comment to Cybernate's answer: it's not a good practice. Better is to just use that "strip magic quotes" code that I linked as "strip out" or disable magic quotes (but please only do the latter thing if you are sure that all PHP apps on your server are secure without it). –  PleaseStand Dec 28 '10 at 22:53

Have you tried the processData property for $.ajax?

http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax/

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Having same problem. This did not solve the problem for me. Quotes are still escaped during AJAX. –  gibberish Aug 14 '13 at 16:19

Composing SQL directly with user-generated text is suicidal. See here if you don't understand why.

Composing SQL with mysql_real_escape_string applied to user-generated text is a poor idea, as it makes the queries difficult to optimize (although compared to not using mysql_real_escape_string at all it's like jabbing yourself in the neck with a sharp pencil compared to jabbing yourself in the neck with a running chainsaw)

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Maybe maghic_quotes_gpc config parameter is set to on in the PHP.ini file. If you have access to that file change the value to off.

If you don't have access then use get_magic_quotes_gpc function to see if magic_quotes is "on" if it is not then call the mysql_real_escape_string function else bypass it.

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Relying on magic_quotes_gpc to escape strings in a MySQL context is a very bad security practice. The proper method is to stripslashes() and then call mysql_real_escape_string() (or better: used named parameters/prepared statements) –  scoates Dec 28 '10 at 22:34
    
@scoates I think you missed the part where I mentioned using the get_magic_quotes_gpc function to use the mysql_real_escape_string as needed and also I mentioned to turn off magic quotes if OP has access to php.ini. –  Chandu Dec 28 '10 at 22:36
    
Magic quotes is on, and I don't have access to PHP.ini. I will use get_magic_quotes_gpc() to check, though. –  Waleed Khan Dec 28 '10 at 22:41
    
my point is that using mysql_real_escape_string always required, no matter what get_magic_quotes_gpc() says (you'll just need to strip it first, if so). –  scoates Dec 29 '10 at 2:20

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