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I am trying to do a simple test with Isolated Storage so I can use it for a Windows Phone 7 application I am making.

The test I am creating sets a creates a key and value with one button, and with the other button sets that value equal to a TextBlock's text.

namespace IsoStore
{
public partial class MainPage : PhoneApplicationPage
{
    // Constructor
    public MainPage()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    public class AppSettings
    {
        IsolatedStorageSettings appSettings = IsolatedStorageSettings.ApplicationSettings;

        private void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            appSettings.Add("email", "someone@somewhere.com");
        }

        private void button2_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            textBlock1.Text = (string)appSettings["email"];
        }
    }      
}
}

This way gives me this error:

Cannot access a non-static member of outer type 'IsoStore.MainPage' via nested type 'IsoStore.MainPage.AppSettings'

So I tried this:

namespace IsoStore
{
public partial class MainPage : PhoneApplicationPage
{
    // Constructor
    public MainPage()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    public class AppSettings
    {
        IsolatedStorageSettings appSettings = IsolatedStorageSettings.ApplicationSettings;

        private void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            appSettings.Add("email", "someone@somewhere.com");
        }

    }

    private void button2_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        textBlock1.Text = (string)appSettings["email"];
    }
}
}

And instead I get this error:

The name 'appSettings' does not exist in the current context

So what obvious problem am I overlooking here?

Thanks so much for your time.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

appSettings is out of scope for button2_Click

Update Since IsolatedStorageSettings.ApplicationSettings is Static anyway there's no need for the reference at all. Just directly access it.

namespace IsoStore
{

 public partial class MainPage : PhoneApplicationPage
 {


    // Constructor
    public MainPage()
    {
    InitializeComponent();


    }


    private void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
    IsolatedStorageSettings.ApplicationSettings.Add("email", "someone@somewhere.com");
    }



    private void button2_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
       textBlock1.Text = (string)IsolatedStorageSettings.ApplicationSettings["email"];
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So I don't even need to create the "appSettings" instance of IsolatedStorage? Would there be a benefit if I did? –  Dan Dec 29 '10 at 2:41
    
@Dan nope not really. You could make an argument for readability, but that's pretty thin. –  Conrad Frix Dec 29 '10 at 3:02
    
Well, thank you very much again for all of your help. –  Dan Dec 29 '10 at 3:12

Try this code, as there isn't any need to define AppSettings class.

namespace IsoStore
{
    public partial class MainPage : PhoneApplicationPage
    {
        IsolatedStorageSettings appSettings;

        // Constructor
        public MainPage()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            appSettings = IsolatedStorageSettings.ApplicationSettings;
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            appSettings.Add("email", "someone@somewhere.com");
        }

        private void button2_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            textBlock1.Text = (string)appSettings["email"];
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works perfectly as well. Why is it that yours did not require the static definition? –  Dan Dec 29 '10 at 1:08
    
The life time of static scope is on class level, therefore when MainPage will be loaded by the CLR the static reference of appSettings will also be created. While in your code, you are only accessing appSettings variable within MainPage member methods (non-static), therefore it is better keep also it as a member variable, and it will get destroyed when the object will get out of scope. –  ShahidAzim Dec 29 '10 at 1:17
    
you right but a) since IsolatedStorageSettings.ApplicationSettings is already static all you're saving by using a non-static reference is a whole 8 Bytes and b) since MainPage probably has the same life cycle as the application its probably actually a savings of 0 bytes. –  Conrad Frix Dec 29 '10 at 2:06
    
No worries, as both solution were provided almost at the same time and only one solution can be accepted. I only provided my explanation that why I used appSettings as member variable. Still button2_Click can be changed further by implementing key existance check but it is better to leave it for @Dan. –  ShahidAzim Dec 29 '10 at 8:47

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