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I'm still new to blocks in objective-c and wondering if I have this psuedo code correct. I'm not sure if it's enough to just remove the observer or if i have to call removeObserver:name:object:

-(void) scan {
    Scanner *scanner = [[Scanner alloc] init];
    id scanComplete = [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserverForName:@"ScanComplete" 
                        object:scanner 
                        queue:nil 
                        usingBlock:^(NSNotification *notification){
                            /*
                             do something
                             */
                            [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] removeObserver:scanComplete];
                            [scanner release];
                        }];
    [scanner startScan];
}

Update: I'm receiving intermittent EXC_BAD_ACCESS from this block, so this can't be right.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Declare the scanComplete variable before defining the block itself.

The reason why you need to do this is because you're trying to access a variable that doesn't exist within the block at the time of definition since the variable itself has not been assigned yet.

What is EXC_BAD_ACCESS? Well, it's an exception that is thrown when you try to access a reference that doesn't exist. So that is exactly the case in your example.

So if you declare the variable before the block itself, then it should work:

-(void) scan {
    Scanner *scanner = [[Scanner alloc] init];
    __block id scanComplete;
    scanComplete = [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserverForName:@"ScanComplete" 
                        object:scanner 
                        queue:nil 
                        usingBlock:^(NSNotification *notification){
                           /*
                           do something
                           */
                           [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] removeObserver:scanComplete];
                           [scanner release];
                    }];
    [scanner startScan];
}
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You need __block id scanComplete;, or it will be copied into the block and you will be leaking observers. –  hwaxxer Apr 15 '11 at 16:17
2  
In the world of ARC, the comment on using __block to avoid capture no longer holds true. What does hold true, is that the __block qualifier fixes a fundamental problem: when the block is defined, addObserverForName:... has not returned yet, so the value that is captured is nil at best (when running under ARC, because of its implicit auto-nil on variable declaration), or undefined, trading one BAD_ACCESS for completely undefined behavior, at worst… –  danyowdee Nov 26 '11 at 22:20
    
Removing the observer by referring to a local variable from inside the block was always skanky. Store the returned observer token (here, scanComplete) as an instance variable; under ARC this should be a __weak instance variable to prevent a retain cycle on self. –  matt Nov 27 '11 at 2:35
2  
@matt Why? What's skanky about wanting to completely localize the scope of all the moving parts involved with block-based notifications? –  LucasTizma Sep 7 '12 at 22:53
    
[scanner release]; should be outside the block –  user102008 Mar 25 '13 at 23:12

You should not unregister in the register block. Instead, store the token returned from addObserverForName (in this case, your scanComplete) as an instance variable or in a collection that is an instance variable, and unregister later when you're about to go out of existence (e.g. in dealloc). What I do is keep an NSMutableSet called observers. So:

id ob = [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] 
     addObserverForName:@"whatever" object:nil queue:nil 
     usingBlock:^(NSNotification *note) {
        // ... whatever ...
}];
[self->observers addObject:ob];

And then later:

for (id ob in self->observers)
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] removeObserver:ob];
self->observers = nil;
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2  
If you want a one-shot notification, I don't see why you shouldn't be able unregister in the block itself. –  ipmcc Nov 3 '12 at 18:09

The scope of the block doesn't have permission to release the scanner object. If you're not using garbage collection, removing the release and making the scanner autorelease ([[[Scanner alloc] init] autorelease]) should do the trick.

You should also be able to safely move the call to removeObserver outside of the block.

For the case of EXC_BAD_ACCESS: Entering bt in the console window after the application crashes will give you a backtrace, and should inform you where the error occurred.

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