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I use a ListActivity to display a list of items. The user can long-press an item in the list to display a contextual menu. This menu contains among other things an option to delete the long-pressed item. When the user selects this option, a dialog pops up asking for confirmation of the deletion. Upon confirmation, the item is deleted from the list.

I would like to reuse the AlertDialog as much as possible. My attempts at using onPrepareDialog(int, View, Bundle) have been defeated by the fact that the Bundle is not passed to the DialogInterface.OnClickListener. I end up having to recreate a listener on every invocation.

I see several ways to solve this:

  1. recreate the dialog on every occasion (pros: simple, cons: wasteful)
  2. keep the DialogInterface.OnClickListener in a field on the ListActivity and keep the item to be deleted as a field of the listener. (pros: no memory waste, cons: need to manage state). Q: is this safe?
  3. have onPrepareDialog update the title, and bind new View.OnClickListeners on the buttons of the AlertDialog. (pros: limit waste, cons: new View.OnClickListener on every invocation).

If DialogInterface.OnClickListener accepted a Bundle, I wouldn't have to jump through hoops to keep track of the item being deleted.

This is not a blocker, but I would love to see an elegant solution. I would love to hear your suggestions :)

Here is the code for option #1, if you want to play with this:

public class Example extends ListActivity {
  private static final int CONFIRM_DELETE_DIALOG = 1;
  private static final String POSITION_KEY = "position";

  private ArrayAdapter<String> mAdapter;

  @Override
  public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    mAdapter = new ArrayAdapter<String>(
        this, android.R.layout.simple_list_item_1,
        new String[] { "one", "two" });
    setListAdapter(mAdapter);
    registerForContextMenu(getListView());
  }

  @Override
  public void onCreateContextMenu(ContextMenu menu, View v, ContextMenuInfo menuInfo) {
    super.onCreateContextMenu(menu, v, menuInfo);
    getMenuInflater().inflate(R.menu.my_lovely_menu, menu);
  }

  @Override
  public boolean onContextItemSelected(MenuItem item) {
    AdapterContextMenuInfo info = (AdapterContextMenuInfo) item.getMenuInfo();
    switch (item.getItemId()) {
    case R.id.delete_item:
      Bundle bundle = new Bundle();
      bundle.putInt(POSITION_KEY, info.position);
      showDialog(CONFIRM_DELETE_DIALOG, bundle);
      return true;
    default:
      return super.onContextItemSelected(item);
    }
  }

  @Override
  protected Dialog onCreateDialog(int id, Bundle args) {
    switch (id) {
    case CONFIRM_DELETE_DIALOG:
      final int position = args.getInt(POSITION_KEY);
      AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder();
      builder.setCancelable(false);
      builder.setTitle(String.format(
          getString(R.string.confirm_delete), mAdapter.getItem(position)));
      DialogInterface.OnClickListener listener = new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
          switch (which) {
          case DialogInterface.BUTTON_POSITIVE:
            mAdapter.remove(mAdapter.getItem(position));
            // Dismiss the dialog to ensure OnDismissListeners are notified.
            dialog.dismiss();
            break;
          case DialogInterface.BUTTON_NEGATIVE:
            // Cancel the dialog to ensure OnCancelListeners are notified.
            dialog.cancel();
            break;
          }
          // Remove the dialog so it is re-created next time it is required.
          removeDialog(CONFIRM_DELETE_DIALOG);
        }
      };
      builder.setPositiveButton(android.R.string.yes, listener);
      builder.setNegativeButton(android.R.string.no, listener);
      return builder.create();
    default:
      return super.onCreateDialog(id, args);
    }
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
I'd like to ask why you consider creating a new dialog each time a user long-presses an item wasteful. Generally, a dialog is something the user is forced to interact with until an outcome is satisfied at which point the dialog is destroyed and cleaned out of memory. So, only 1 ever exists at any given time. What are you wasting in this case? – user432209 Dec 29 '10 at 3:50
    
Because memory is precious on handheld devices, and speed matters! Dialogs are meant to be reused, that is the purpose of onPrepareDialog. Creating a new dialog each time allocates a pile of objects instead of reusing most of them. These objects will later have to be garbage collected. I am trying to minimize the work required for these dialogs. As I said, this isn't a blocker, but I'd like to find an more elegant solution. – Ozone Dec 29 '10 at 9:36

I think option 1, or something very close to it, is likely to be the most elegant solution available.

Option 1 and the sample code should work, but the pattern is susceptible to being inadvertently used with the dialog changed to setCancelable(true). If that happens then it is possible to dismiss the dialog by using the Back button and therefore skip the removeDialog(CONFIRM_DELETE_DIALOG). That would cause the dialog to open next time with potentially the wrong value for position.

For that reason, I think the option 1 approach should be adjusted to relocate the removeDialog(CONFIRM_DELETE_DIALOG) from the DialogInterface.onClickListener of onCreateDialog to a DialogInterface.OnDismissListener, set up in onPrepareDialog:

protected void onPrepareDialog(int id, Dialog dialog, Bundle args) {
    switch (id) {
    case CONFIRM_DELETE_DIALOG:
        dialog.setOnDismissListener(new DialogInterface.OnDismissListener() {
            public void onDismiss(DialogInterface dialog) {
                removeDialog(CONFIRM_DELETE_DIALOG);
            }
        });
        break;
    default:
        super.onPrepareDialog(id, dialog, args);
    }
}

An alternative, avoiding the use of onPrepareDialog, is to bind the DialogInterface.OnDismissListener in onCreateDialog:

    Dialog dialog = builder.create();
    dialog.setOnDismissListener(new DialogInterface.OnDismissListener() {
        public void onDismiss(DialogInterface dialog) {
            removeDialog(CONFIRM_DELETE_DIALOG);
        }
    });
    return dialog;
share|improve this answer

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