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I've an AJAX request which will be made every 5 seconds. But the problem is before the AJAX request if the previous request is not completed I've to abort that request and make a new request.

My code is something like this, how to resolve this issue?

$(document).ready(
    var fn = function(){
        $.ajax({
            url: 'ajax/progress.ftl',
            success: function(data) {
                //do something
            }
        });
    };

    var interval = setInterval(fn, 500);
);
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8  
possible duplicate of Kill ajax requests using javascript using jquery. –  karim79 Dec 29 '10 at 3:06
1  
Your question states the request should happen every 5 seconds, but the code uses 500 ms = 0.5 s. –  geon Nov 26 '13 at 7:04
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6 Answers 6

up vote 149 down vote accepted

The jquery ajax method returns a XMLHttpRequest object. You can use this object to cancel the request.

The XMLHttpRequest has a abort method, which cancels the request.
Note: If the request has already been sent to the server then the server will process the request even if we abort the request but the client will not wait for/handle the response.

The xhr object also contains a readystate which contains the state of the request(UNSENT-0, OPENED-1, HEADERS_RECEIVED-2, LOADING-3 and DONE-4). we can use this to check whether the previous request was completed.

$(document).ready(
    var xhr;

    var fn = function(){
        if(xhr && xhr.readystate != 4){
            xhr.abort();
        }
        xhr = $.ajax({
            url: 'ajax/progress.ftl',
            success: function(data) {
                //do something
            }
        });
    };

    var interval = setInterval(fn, 500);
);

JQUERY 1.5 UPDATE

Since jQuery 1.5 the $.ajax function now returns a jqXHR object. It still provides many of the old XMLHttpRequest properties for backwards compatibility but seems to capitalise the readystate property which breaks compatibility! Anyway the code above needs to be changed to use readyState for it to continue functioning:

$(document).ready(
    var xhr;

    var fn = function(){
        if(xhr && xhr.readyState != 4){
            xhr.abort();
        }
        xhr = $.ajax({
            url: 'ajax/progress.ftl',
            success: function(data) {
                //do something
            }
        });
    };

    var interval = setInterval(fn, 500);
);
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12  
I don't see any difference between the code above and the code below... –  romkyns Sep 14 '11 at 10:23
2  
@rtpHarry Thanks for the update wrt jQuery 1.5 –  Arun P Johny Sep 14 '11 at 10:53
33  
@romkyns The differences is the property readystate above and readyState below, the character s is capitalized in jQuery 1.5 –  Arun P Johny Sep 14 '11 at 10:55
1  
Indeed, thanks! –  romkyns Sep 14 '11 at 11:24
3  
Btw, I think the readyState check is unnecessary, since it is deferred and once it's resolved or rejected it won't run the others. So if (xhr) xhr.abort(); will work just fine too. –  Ciantic Nov 26 '13 at 13:11
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Why should you abort the request?

If each request takes more than five seconds, what will happen?

You shouldn't abort the request if the parameter passing with the request is not changing. eg:- the request is for retrieving the notification data. In such situations, The nice approach is that set a new request only after completing the previous Ajax request.

$(document).ready(

    var fn = function(){

        $.ajax({
            url: 'ajax/progress.ftl',
            success: function(data) {
                //do something
            },

            complete: function(){setTimeout(fn, 500);}
        });
    };

     var interval = setTimeout(fn, 500);

);
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This is a bad idea. When starting a new call, you don't want the complete event to be fired of the previous call. You might get very weird results with this approach. –  Webberig Apr 7 at 8:34
    
@Webberig Thanks! updated the answer with the situation. –  HabeebPerwad Apr 7 at 9:19
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When you make a request to a server, have it check to see if a progress is not null (or fetching that data) first. If it is fetching data, abort the previous request and initiate the new one.

var progress = null

function fn () {

if (progress) {
progress.abort();
}
progress = $.ajax('ajax/progress.ftl',{
success: function(data) {
//do something
progress = null;
}
});
}
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Just use ajax.abort() for example you could abort any pending ajax request before sending another one like this

//check for existing ajax request
if(ajax){ 
 ajax.abort();
 }
//then you make another ajax request
$.ajax(
 //your code here
  );
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jQuery: Use this as a starting point - as inspiration. I solved it like this: (this is not a perfect solution, it just aborts the last instance and is WIP code)

var singleAjax = function singleAjax_constructor(url, params) {
    // remember last jQuery's get request
    if (this.lastInstance) {
        this.lastInstance.abort();  // triggers .always() and .fail()
        this.lastInstance = false;
    }

    // how to use Deferred : http://api.jquery.com/category/deferred-object/
    var $def = new $.Deferred();

    // pass the deferrer's request handlers into the get response handlers
    this.lastInstance = $.get(url, params)
        .fail($def.reject)         // triggers .always() and .fail()
        .success($def.resolve);    // triggers .always() and .done()

    // return the deferrer's "control object", the promise object
    return $def.promise();
}


// initiate first call
singleAjax('/ajax.php', {a: 1, b: 2})
    .always(function(a,b,c) {console && console.log(a,b,c);});

// second call kills first one
singleAjax('/ajax.php', {a: 1, b: 2})
    .always(function(a,b,c) {console && console.log(a,b,c);});
    // here you might use .always() .fail() .success() etc.
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You should also check for readyState 0. Because when you use xhr.abort() this function set readyState to 0 in this object, and your if check will be always true - readyState !=4

$(document).ready(
    var xhr;

    var fn = function(){
        if(xhr && xhr.readyState != 4 && xhr.readyState != 0){
            xhr.abort();
        }
        xhr = $.ajax({
            url: 'ajax/progress.ftl',
            success: function(data) {
                //do something
            }
        });
    };

    var interval = setInterval(fn, 500);
); 
share|improve this answer
    
Did you copy and paste Arun's answer? Because the likelihood of two code blocks like that being exactly the same, spacing and all... –  user2700923 Dec 11 '13 at 3:46
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