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I have following perl script

#!/usr/bin/perl
$userinput =  <STDIN>;
chomp ($userinput);
while ( $userinput ne "DONE")
{
        print STDOUT "User typed ----->  $userinput\n";
        $userinput =  <STDIN>;
        chomp ($userinput);
}

I have copied this on on unix box, locally this works fine but when I try to run this perl script remotely from another box using ssh, it does not work.

I am running this script using following command.

ssh username@hostname /tmp/testremote.pl

It just hangs on the STDIN and does not return anything.

Any idea why this is not working?

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Just to be clear: /tmp/testremote.pl must exist on the remote machine -- does it? –  j_random_hacker Dec 29 '10 at 6:36
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try adding $|=1; after the #! line.

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Thanks This works. –  Avinash Dec 29 '10 at 6:50
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your terminal's STDIN is probably not being redirected correctly to the remote terminal.

You can try:

ssh username@hostname 'echo bla bla bla | /tmp/testremote.pl'

And if this works it will indicate that the perl script is fine, but the problem is your redirection.

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Would be a good test if not for the single quote after the last "bla". –  j_random_hacker Dec 30 '10 at 3:46
    
you're right. I fixed it. –  Nathan Fellman Dec 30 '10 at 4:21
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ssh username@hostname '/tmp/testremote.pl'

Please try to add single quote to your command.

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2  
That won't do anything. –  John Kugelman Dec 29 '10 at 6:27
1  
That will only help if the command being sent to ssh requires shell interpolation. –  Nathan Fellman Dec 29 '10 at 6:36
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