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I'm not trying to make a joke here but I am very confused I been trying to figure this out for like 6 hours straight now got about 20 notepads opened up here, 15 calculators and I cant crunch it I'm always getting too much excess in the end.

Lets explain some variables here we got to work with. Say we got

2566 min points / 2566 max points

0 min xp / 4835 max xp

There is 2 types of jobs that need to use both variables (points and xp)

Job (1) subtracts 32 points per click and adds 72 xp per click.

Job (2) subtracts 10 points per click and adds 14 xp per click.

I'm trying to figure out how to calculate the excess properly. So it would waste the minimal amount of Job(1)'s to still have enough points to do as much Job(2)'s as it possibly can and still reach max xp.

Thats the thing I dont want to run Job1's until there are no more points left because in doing so, the Job1's will exceeds the maximum XP (2566) and I will never get to do any Job2's.

I want to get the maximum possible Job2's in then using proper calculation achieve or overflow the MaxXP of 2566 with Job1's to always achieve max XP. Pretty much my situation is that I need to get 2566 MaxXP to be able to continue completing jobs. While keeping that in mind I want to place most priority on job2's and only use Job1's to achieve the necessary MaxXP of 2566 to reset the min points to max to redo the process all over. I am trying to automate this.

Here is my equations

amountOfJob1s = (minPoints / 32)

amountOfJob2s = (minPoints / 10)

excessXP = (amountOfJob1s * 72) - maxXP

if excessXP < 0 then break

Results

mustDoJob1s = ???

mustDoJob2s = ???

Thank you if anyone can help me figure this out so I can put a good equation here I'd appreciate it.

Either this is not mathematically possible or I just can't crunch it I do believe I have enough variables.

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closed as off topic by duffymo, Will Dec 29 '10 at 20:31

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
"new mathematical breakthrough?" - Nope. – Mitch Wheat Dec 29 '10 at 7:36
3  
The answer? You would first have to post a question that makes sense, I'm afraid. – Mitch Wheat Dec 29 '10 at 7:43
1  
Try explaining your problem a bit better. From what I can see just run with Job1 until there are no more points, then run Job2 until there are no more points. Intro+Problem=Good :) – Tedd Hansen Dec 29 '10 at 7:49
1  
Downvoted because this question is extremely unclear. Your comments seem to suggest the opposite of what your question seems to be asking, but leaves me so unsure as to not be able to even hazard an actual guess. – Andrew Barber Dec 29 '10 at 8:05
1  
The question is too unclear to answer. You haven't explained what any of your 'variables' are, the nature of the problem you're trying to solve, what a 'point' is, what an 'xp' is, and so on. It would also help if you weren't such a pompous ass to the people trying to help you. – Tom W Dec 29 '10 at 9:30
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Let job1 be the amount of job1 and job2 be the amount of job2. We are left with two equations and two unknowns:

job1 * 32 + job2 * 10 = 2566
job1 * 72 + job2 * 14 = 4835

So:

job1 = 45.683...
job2 = 110.411...

Given job1 as the higher xp/point ratio and you wanna go over 4835 xp, round job1 up, compute job2 and round it down.

job1 = 46

job1 * 32 + job2 * 10 = 2566
job2 = 109.4

job2 = 109

Check:

job1 * 32 + job2 * 10 = 2562 points
job1 * 72 + job2 * 14 = 4838 xp

Done.

Two unknowns is hardly a 'new mathematical breakthrough' :)

share|improve this answer
    
Wow dude sorta pisses me off the fascination how smart people are but yes you cracked it, you should write this a theory about this. I came to the same conclusion about 5 mins ago before reading this using 2 LOOPS one doing a decrement of MAX possible job2 and increment on MAX possible job1's and came to 109,46 like you but its CPU heavy I can't believe a mathematical equation for this sort of stuff actually exists who comes up with these things. – SSpoke Dec 29 '10 at 9:28
    
m=(32*14)-(10*72); x=(2566*14) -(10*4835); y=(32*4835)-(2566*72); x_answer=x/m; y_answer=y/m; – SSpoke Dec 29 '10 at 9:51

I assume you want to get as much "XP" as possible, while spending no more than 2566 "points" by "clicking" an integer number of times {n1, n2} on each of two "jobs". Here is the answer in Mathematica:

In[8]:= Maximize[{72 n1 + 14 n2, n1 >= 0, n2 >= 0, 
  32 n1 + 10 n2 <= 2566}, {n1, n2}, Integers]

Out[8]= {5956, {n1 -> 80, n2 -> 0}}

Or, maybe you need to spend exactly 2566 points? Then the best you can do is:

In[9]:= Maximize[{72 n1 + 14 n2, n1 >= 0, n2 >= 0, 
  32 n1 + 10 n2 == 2566}, {n1, n2}, Integers]

Out[9]= {5714, {n1 -> 78, n2 -> 7}}

Is this what you wanted?

share|improve this answer
    
Thats the thing Andrew I dont want to run Job1's until there are no more points left because in doing so, the Job1's will exceeds the maximum XP (2566) and I will never get to do any Job2's. I want to get the maximum possible Job2's in then using proper calculation finnsh the MaxXP with Job1's to always achieve max XP. Pretty much my situation is that I need to get 2566 MaxXP to be able to continue completing jobs. While keeping that in mind I want to place most priority on job2's and only use Job1's to finish up MaxXP to 2566. – SSpoke Dec 29 '10 at 7:58
    
Also I don't have those functions Maximize I'm using a functional programming langauge with limited operators. How would I do this in either Java/PHP/C/C++/.NET/VB? – SSpoke Dec 29 '10 at 8:00
    
From what I understand your a very smart man I hope you can help me out because everyone else is just a wise ass and I got this project due in 8 AM and it's 3 AM right now I've been up all night I usually never run into math problems I thought I could figure this out turns out i'm dumb. In your Out[9] = {} seems to be output I see n1= 78 and n2 = 7 but I'm trying to get maximum amount of n2's and least amount of n1's I don;t need to EXACTLY waste that much points I just want to make it most efficient it MAY overflow the Max XP but it cannot go below. – SSpoke Dec 29 '10 at 8:04

Let a be the number of Job 1 and b the number of Job 2.

XP = 72 a + 14 b
P = 32 a + 10 b

You appear to want to solve for a and b, such that XP <= 4835, P <= 2566 and b is as large as possible.

72 a + 14 b <= 4835
32 a + 10 b <= 2566

b will be largest when a = 0, i.e.

b <= 4835 ÷ 14, => b <= 345
b <= 2566 ÷ 10, => b <= 256 

As b must be both below 345 and 256, it must be below 256.

Substitute back in:

72 a + 14 × 256 <= 4835, => a <= ( 4835 - 14 × 256 ) ÷ 72, => a <= 17
32 a + 10 × 256 <= 2566, => a <= ( 2566 - 10 × 256 ) ÷ 32, => a <= 0

so a = 0, XP is 2560 and points used is 3584.

Alternatively, you can solve for the closest satisfaction of the two inequalities

72 a + 14 b <= 4835                (1)
32 a + 10 b <= 2566                (2) 
b <= ( 2566 - 32 a ) ÷ 10          (3) rearrange 2
72 a <= 4835 - 1.4 ( 2566 - 32 a ) (4) subst 3 into 1
27.2 a <= 1242.6
a <= 45.68

so choose a = 45 as the largest integer solution, giving b = 112, XP is 4808, points used is 2560

For either of these, there's no computer programming required; if the constants associated with the two jobs change, then the formulas change.

For harder to solve examples, the relevant area of mathematics is called linear programming

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for explaining but in the end your math ended up a bit short. with b=112 and a=45 I only get 4808 XP instead of the necessary 4835 XP. Your code is a bit too crazy for my mind. The other poster Nicolas Repiquet who told me about the Two Unknowns came up with the perfect answer of a=46 b=109 (probably the floor/ceiling) thing but you thoughtfully explained it and I really appreciate it I dont know who to give the answer to I hope you will not be mad but I like the shorter answer better. – SSpoke Dec 29 '10 at 9:45

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