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if every assignment creates a temporary to copy the object into lvalue, how can you check to see in VC++ 8.0?

class E
{
   int i, j;
public:
   E():i(0), j(0){}
   E(int I, int J):i(I), j(J){}
};

int main()
{
   E a;
   E b(1, 2);
   a = b //would there be created two copies of b?
}

Edit:

Case 2:

    class A
    {
       int i, j;
       public:
         A():i(0), j(0){}
    };

    class E
    {
       int i, j;
       A a;
    public:
       E():i(0), j(0){}
       E(int I, int J):i(I), j(J){}
       E(const E &temp)
       {
          a = temp; //temporary copy made?
       }
    };

   int main()
   {
      E a;
      E b(1, 2);
      a = b //would there be created two copies of b?
   }
share|improve this question
3  
I don't understand your question. There are no temporaries created here, you just end up with 1 in a.i and 2 in a.j. – icecrime Dec 29 '10 at 9:42
    
I came about with question reading an article here: parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/ctors.html#faq-10.6 which states a temporary is created before assignment. – kox Dec 29 '10 at 9:46
    
E():i(0), j(0) -> This is initialization, using an initialization list. E(){ i = 0; j = 0;} -> This is assignment. You have confused assignment in constructors with assignment operator. – DumbCoder Dec 29 '10 at 9:49
    
Your example is a different situation than what is described in that article. The article refers specifically to initialisation of class members inside a constructor. Your assignment is a regular assignment from one object to another inside main(). – Greg Hewgill Dec 29 '10 at 9:51
    
With a = b + c you'd get a temporary variable D that then is stored in a. But some compilers may optimize D away. When in the overloaded assignment operator you can see this temporary var as the argument that is passed to the assignmentn constructor. – RedX Dec 29 '10 at 9:55

From your comment, you made it clear that you didn't quite understand this C++-FAQ item.

First of all, there are no temporaries in the code you presented. The compiler declared A::operator= is called, and you simply end up with 1 in a.i and 2 in a.j.

Now, regarding the link you provided, it has to do with constructors only. In the following code :

class A
{
public:
    A()
    {
        s = "foo";
    }

private:
    std::string s;
};

The data member s is constructed using std::string parameterless constructor, then is assigned the value "foo" in A constructor body. It's preferable (and as a matter of fact necessary in some cases) to initialize data members in an initialization list, just like you did with i and j :

A() : s("foo")
{
}

Here, the s data member is initialized in one step : by calling the appropriate constructor.

share|improve this answer

There are a few standard methods that are created automatically for you if you don't provide them. If you write

struct Foo
{
int i, j;
Foo(int i, int j) : i(i), j(j) {}
};

the compiler completes that to

struct Foo
{
int i, j;

Foo(int i, int j) : i(i), j(j)
{
}

Foo(const Foo& other) : i(other.i), j(other.j)
{
}

Foo& operator=(const Foo& other)
{
    i = other.i; j = other.j;
    return *this;
}
};

In other words you will normally get a copy constructor and an assignment operator that work on an member-by-member basis. In the specific the assignment operator doesn't build any temporary object.

It's very important to understand how those implicitly defined method works because most of the time they're exact the right thing you need, but sometimes they're completely wrong (for example if your members are pointers often a member-by-member copy or assignment is not the correct way to handle the operation).

share|improve this answer

This would create a temporary:

E makeE( int i, int j )
{
   return E(i, j);
}

int main()
{
   E a;
   a = makeE( 1, 2 );
   E b = makeE( 3, 4 ); 
}

makeE returns a temporary. a is assigned to the temporary and the assignment operator is always called here. b is not "assigned to", as it is being initialised here, and requires an accessible copy-constructor for that to work although it is not guaranteed that the copy-constructor will actually be called as the compiler might optimise it away.

share|improve this answer
    
that depends on the compiler – BЈовић Dec 29 '10 at 10:15

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