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I have a database created by some application. Whole database is more than 50 gb, some problems with backups are occurring and my task is to get this database as small as possible.

Especially one table is very big(22 gb), from which 16.5 gb is taken by indexes, rest 5.5 gb is data. It contains little more than 12 000 000 rows.

Could You tell me is it possible to shrink the indexes? I've already tried rebuilding, reorganizing, recreating clustered index, dbcc cleantable. I also know that nvarchar type takes twice size than varchar, so I changed columns type to varchar, but thanks to that I saved only about 2 gb(1 gb on data and 1 gb on indexes).

Here is an sql for this table(fld0 and fld1 are always NULL):

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[DOC8](
 [ASSOCIATION] [nvarchar](64) NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [DOCID] [char](32) NOT NULL,
 [FLD0] [nvarchar](255) NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [FLD1] [nvarchar](2048) NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [FLD10] [nvarchar](255) NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [FLD2] [nvarchar](32) NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [FLD3] [nvarchar](255) NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [FLD4] [nvarchar](255) NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [FLD5] [datetime] NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [FLD6] [nvarchar](255) NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [FLD7] [nvarchar](255) NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [FLD8] [nvarchar](255) NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [FLD9] [datetime] NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [PARENTID] [char](32) NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [POOLID] [char](32) NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [PROPERTIES] [ntext] NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [FLD11] [nvarchar](255) NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
 [FLD12] [nvarchar](255) NULL DEFAULT (NULL),
PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
 [DOCID] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY] TEXTIMAGE_ON [PRIMARY]
GO
SET ANSI_PADDING OFF
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [DOC8_IDX_0] ON [dbo].[DOC8] 
(
 [ASSOCIATION] ASC,
 [PARENTID] ASC,
 [POOLID] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [DOC8_IDX_1] ON [dbo].[DOC8] 
(
 [POOLID] ASC,
 [FLD0] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [DOC8_IDX_10] ON [dbo].[DOC8] 
(
 [POOLID] ASC,
 [FLD11] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [DOC8_IDX_11] ON [dbo].[DOC8] 
(
 [POOLID] ASC,
 [FLD12] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [DOC8_IDX_2] ON [dbo].[DOC8] 
(
 [POOLID] ASC,
 [FLD2] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [DOC8_IDX_3] ON [dbo].[DOC8] 
(
 [POOLID] ASC,
 [FLD3] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [DOC8_IDX_4] ON [dbo].[DOC8] 
(
 [POOLID] ASC,
 [FLD4] ASC,
 [FLD5] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [DOC8_IDX_5] ON [dbo].[DOC8] 
(
 [POOLID] ASC,
 [FLD6] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [DOC8_IDX_6] ON [dbo].[DOC8] 
(
 [POOLID] ASC,
 [FLD7] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [DOC8_IDX_7] ON [dbo].[DOC8] 
(
 [POOLID] ASC,
 [FLD8] ASC,
 [FLD9] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [DOC8_IDX_8] ON [dbo].[DOC8] 
(
 [POOLID] ASC,
 [FLD10] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [DOC8_IDX_9] ON [dbo].[DOC8] 
(
 [PARENTID] ASC,
 [POOLID] ASC,
 [DOCID] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
share|improve this question
2  
I really hope you've obfuscated those column names just for this post. Should I use FLD5 or FLD10 for this query... –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Dec 29 '10 at 11:33
    
@Marek Grzenkowicz I changed only columns which didn't contain any "weird" chracters like column DOCID which looks like 00056231DFDE11DEAC32001143DEC5F6. I didn't touch any column that can have some multilangual characters @Damien_The_Unbeliever As I sad. The database is used by the DMS software and it was created automatically by the application. I don't have any effect on the column names it creates –  zavaz Dec 29 '10 at 12:18
    
@Marek Grzenkowicz By weird I meant only normal English characters and numbers :) It's 3rd party software. We tried to contact them to see if they could help us or maybe give us a hint what to do, but they don't work until end of the year –  zavaz Dec 29 '10 at 12:29
    
@Marek Grzenkowicz I don't know the exact answer for this question. I was only told that there is a problem with backups(probably they don't have enough storage space) and my task is to get the database as small as possible. –  zavaz Dec 29 '10 at 12:31
1  
If this is a third party application, I would investigate buying a new one from someone else. This is one of the most poorly designed tables I have ever seen in 30 years of working with databases. The competence of those who designed it is clearly in question and I wouldn't trust my business data to them. –  HLGEM Dec 29 '10 at 14:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Looking at your table definition

Primary key:

  • You have a char(32) clustered index. This 32 bytes appears in every non-clustered index

Columns:

  • Why char(32)? -> varchar(32)
  • Why nvarchar()? -> varchar
  • Why datetime? -> smalldatetime
  • Why ntext? -> varchar(max)

Indexes:

  • Can you use INCLUDE rather than having key columns

Your main issue is bad choice of clustered index. If you can't fix that, pretty much everything else is pointless: unless you delete data...

When you changed to varchar, you saved 2GB out of 22GB. That's 9% which is quite reasonable whith no other optimisations. It also shows that you don't need nvarchar...

If you change to an int surrogate key, you'd save 28 bytes per row per non-clustered index. That's 3.7 GB minimum (12 x 12,000,000 x 28) but will be more because of more rows per page. And it's transparent to the client code.

Then you start checking for index usage...

However, you should look at capacity planning and plan for data growth. The changes I suggest here will reduce growth rate as well as current size, but if you need another 50 million rows then you need to plan for this. For example, can you compress your backups?

share|improve this answer
    
Thank You for Your post. I've noticed that POOLID column occurs in almost every index, so I deleted it from all the indexes except one. That operation gave me about 5 gb of space which is great start :) Unfortunately DOCID is like this 00056231DFDE11DEAC32001143DEC5F6, so I can't change it to integer. I'll try changing column types as You suggest and I'll see how big impact will it have. Ofcourse, I'm working on a table copy, so I can check every option. –  zavaz Dec 29 '10 at 12:24
3  
Don't change DOCID, but add a IDENTITY column as the clustered index. PK can still be DOCID but non.clustered. FYI I have billion row tables at 65GB data + 112GB indexes :-) –  gbn Dec 29 '10 at 13:08
1  
+1. @zavaz I would only add this: try enabling page compression. I think your data is highly compressible. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc280464.aspx –  Remus Rusanu Dec 31 '10 at 18:24

You can check if all the indexes are actually used and drop the ones you don't need, but generally you are approaching the problem in a wrong way - even if you manage to make the database smaller today, it will keep growing and in a few months you'll be facing the same problem again.

Unless the database contains lots of unnecessary data and/or indexes that you can delete, you have to find a way to manage a database of such size.

Before you start dropping columns and indexes, change columns' data types, you need to be absolutely sure how this will affect the application operation and performance. However, this is a 3rd party software and its developers will not answer your questions for the next few days (they don't work until end of the year), so there is absolutely no way to predict all negative effects of such blind database structure changes. The system won't probably fail immediately, but your changes combined with future software updates (prepared by people unaware of modifications made by you) may produce catastrophic results.

share|improve this answer
    
No, unfortunately I don't know what the fld0 and fld1 columns are used for :/ –  zavaz Dec 29 '10 at 12:34
2  
+1. Seriously 50gb is SMALL. No problem here. Get adequate hardware, be happy. I personally am running my own 800b database slowly filling up (no autogrow, sorry). –  TomTom Dec 29 '10 at 13:01

Find indexes not in use and remove them. This will also cut down on the amount of writes the drive has to make for dui's (deletes, updates, and inserts). See Brent Ozar's blog on how to do this: http://sqlserverpedia.com/wiki/Find_Indexes_Not_In_Use

Basically, if your reads/write is low ( <0.1 ), then the index is hurting you more than it is helping and possibly needs to go anyway. You will need to carefully consider before dropping an index though.

You may also benefit from filtered indexes. http://sqlfool.com/2009/04/filtered-indexes-what-you-need-to-know/

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the link to the article about finding indexes not in use. Massively handy thanks! –  Ghlouw Dec 15 '11 at 11:04

Definately review the index, do you really need all those indexes of the pattern [POOLID],[FLD]? If their existance can't be justified, then they shouldn't exist.

I'm assuming the DOCID etc are GUIDS without hyphens. If you could start again, I would chose to use the inbuilt guid type rather than char32, which would halve the size of the indecies you have, but that's not a simple change because microsoft were silly and made it so you had to put hyphens in their guid types and then the application has to have extra space in structures or translate the hyphens out.

share|improve this answer

After playing around with this problem I came to the final stage where: - data reduced from 5 451 477 MB to 4 088 609 MB - indexes reduced from 15 361 391 MB to 6 003 094 MB

Here are steps which I made(maybe it will be useful for somebody):

  1. Changed 9 column types from nvarchar to varchar - data: 4 460 305 MB, indexes - 14 456 383 MB
  2. Removed reduntant columns which occured in more than one index - data: 4 460 305 MB, indexes - 9 592 320 MB
  3. Changed two columns from char(32) to varchar(32) and one column from ntext to varchar(max) - data: 4 088 609 MB, indexes: 9 294 117 MB
  4. Created new integer indentity column, deleted clustered index which was made from DOCID char(32) column, created new non-clustered index with DOCID column, created new clustered index with newly added identity column - data: 4 088 609 MB, indexes: 6 003 094 MB

Thank You for helping me to solve this problem :)

share|improve this answer
    
Ofcourse I made it only on the test table to see the impact of each change. For a 'production' I will have to make some more tests before I'll even think about making any changes there ;) –  zavaz Dec 30 '10 at 13:28

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