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I can't get the meaning of onStart() transition state. The onResume() method is always called after onStart(). Why can't it be the onResume() is invoked after onRestart() and onCreate() methods just excluding onStart()? What is its purpose?

Why can't we live without onStart(). I still consider it as redundant (probably because don't understand its meaning completely).

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Look here for the application lifecycle : d.android.com/guide/topics/fundamentals.html –  ykatchou Dec 29 '10 at 12:31

7 Answers 7

up vote 185 down vote accepted
+50

Why can't it be the onResume() is invoked after onRestart() and onCreate() methods just excluding onStart()? What is its purpose?

OK, as my first answer was pretty long I won't extend it further so let's try this...

public DriveToWorkActivity extends Activity
    implements onReachedGroceryStoreListener {
}

public GroceryStoreActivity extends Activity {}

PLEASE NOTE: I've deliberately left out the calls to things like super.onCreate(...) etc. This is pseudo-code so give me some artistic licence here. ;)

The methods for DriveToWorkActivity follow...

protected void onCreate(...) {
    openGarageDoor();
    unlockCarAndGetIn();
    closeCarDoorAndPutOnSeatBelt();
    putKeyInIgnition();
}

protected void onStart() {
    startEngine();
    changeRadioStation();
    switchOnLightsIfNeeded();
    switchOnWipersIfNeeded();
}

protected void onResume() {
    applyFootbrake();
    releaseHandbrake();
    putCarInGear();
    drive();
}

protected void onPause() {
    putCarInNeutral();
    applyHandbrake();
}

protected void onStop() {
    switchEveryThingOff();
    turnOffEngine();
    removeSeatBeltAndGetOutOfCar();
    lockCar();
}

protected void onDestroy() {
    enterOfficeBuilding();
}

protected void onReachedGroceryStore(...) {
    Intent i = new Intent(ACTION_GET_GROCERIES, ...,  this, GroceryStoreActivity.class);
}

protected void onRestart() {
    unlockCarAndGetIn();
    closeDoorAndPutOnSeatBelt();
    putKeyInIgnition();
}

OK, so it's another long one (sorry folks). But here's my explanation...

onResume() is when I start driving and onPause() is when I come to a temporary stop. So I drive then reach a red light so I pause...the light goes green and I resume. Another red light and I pause, then green so I resume. The onPause() -> onResume() -> onPause() -> onResume() loop is a tight one and occurs many times through my journey.

The loop from being stopped back through a restart (preparing to carry on my journey) to starting again is perhaps less common. In one case, I spot the Grocery Store and the GroceryStoreActivity is started (forcing my DriveToWorkActivity to the point of onStop()). When I return from the store, I go through onRestart() and onStart() then resume my journey.

I could put the code that's in onStart() into both onCreate() and onRestart() and not bother to override onStart() at all but the more that needs to be done between onCreate() -> onResume() and onRestart() -> onResume(), the more I'm duplicating things.

So, to requote once more...

Why can't it be the onResume() is invoked after onRestart() and onCreate() methods just excluding onStart()?

If you don't override onStart() then this is effectively what happens. Although the onStart() method of Activity will be called implicitly, the effect in your code is effectively onCreate() -> onResume() or onRestart() -> onResume().

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1  
very nice explanation! –  Sourav Mar 10 '11 at 8:20
2  
You're the man. –  eros Aug 2 '11 at 8:28
    
Awesome explanation man –  scooby Feb 23 '12 at 4:56
1  
@Dheeraj: No not necessarily. This is pseudo code and meant to just illustrate how each stage of the Activity life-cycle might be used. The creation stage onCreate(...) may well do a great deal when it comes to instantiating instance members (UI elements etc) but a 'restart' shouldn't need to do that. In reality many Activities don't really need to implement more than onCreate(...), onResume() and onPause() the other methods are available for cases where you might need to do other things and the key is to understand where to put the code. –  Squonk Apr 7 '12 at 7:04
1  
This is why I have come to hate the Android API compared to iOS and even WP7... Ive been making a game that runs on all three in C# and I have to say i'm rly disappointed with Google and Android. They seem to be lacking in the Language / API design department. I rly hope some other linux phone OS takes over, cuz I do vote for Open Source in general... –  zezba9000 Jul 8 '12 at 2:10

Short answer:

We can't live without onStart because that is the state when the activity becomes "visible" to the user, but the user cant "interact" with it yet may be cause it's overlapped with some other small dialog. This ability to interact with the user is the one that differentiates onStart and onResume. Think of it as a person behind a glass door. You can see the person but you can't interact (talk/listen/shake hands) with him. OnResume is like the door opener after which you can begin the interaction.

Additionally onRestart() is the least understood one. We can ask the question as to why not directly go to onStart() or onResume() after onStop() instead of onRestart(). It becomes easier to understand if we note that onRestart() is partially equivalent to onCreate() if the creation part is omitted. Basically both states lead to onStart() (i.e the Activity becomes visible). So both the states have to "prepare" the stuff to be displayed. OnCreate has the additional responsibility to "create" the stuff to be displayed

So their code structures might fit to something like:

onCreate()
{
     createNecessaryObjects();

     prepareObjectsForDisplay();
}


onRestart()
{
     prepareObjectsForDisplay();

}

The entire confusion is caused since Google chose non-intuitive names instead of something as follows:

onCreateAndPrepareToDisplay()   [instead of onCreate() ]
onPrepareToDisplay()            [instead of onRestart() ]
onVisible()                     [instead of onStart() ]
onBeginInteraction()            [instead of onResume() ]
onPauseInteraction()            [instead of onPause() ]
onInvisible()                   [instead of onStop]
onDestroy()                     [no change] 

The Activity Diagram might be interpreted as:

Android Activity Lifecycle

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When I explain it to students, I use maybeOnInvisible() instead of onStop(). And use maybeOnDestroy() instead of onDestroy(). These names work well as explanations I find. Thought, I wouldn't want Google to actually change to these names. –  Stephan Branczyk Dec 21 '13 at 18:37
    
Awsome explanation! –  sealskej Dec 26 '13 at 15:15

onStart() called when the activity is becoming visible to the user. onResume() called when the activity will start interacting with the user. You may want to do different things in this cases, e.g. in onStart() inflate layout of activity and in onResume() restore state of activity.

See this link for reference.

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The book "Hello, Android, Introducing Google's Mobile Development Platform" gives a nice explanation of the life cycle of android apps. Luckily they have the particular chapter online as an excerpt. See the graphic on page 39 in http://media.pragprog.com/titles/eband3/concepts.pdf

By the way, this book is highly recommendable for android beginners!

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2  
Nice image and good book, but still it doesn't give an answer why do we really need onStart() method and what special things we can do in it we can't do in onResume(). –  Eugene Jan 6 '11 at 18:02
6  
onStart() is NOT called, if the app was paused. Your app is "paused" if another app gains the focus but does NOT obscure your app completely. So you may do different things in the "paused" state than you would do in "Stopped" state. Thus, you may do different things if your app is just "resumed" from paused state than you would do if your app is "started" from stopped state or from complete start. Does that help? –  Martin Booka Weser Jan 6 '11 at 19:09

A particularly feisty example is when you decide to show a managed Dialog from an Activity using showDialog(). If the user rotates the screen while the dialog is still open (we call this a "configuration change"), then the main Activity will go through all the ending lifecycle calls up untill onDestroy(), will be recreated, and go back up through the lifecycles. What you might not expect however, is that onCreateDialog() and onPrepareDialog() (the methods that are called when you do showDialog() and now again automatically to recreate the dialog - automatically since it is a managed dialog) are called between onStart() and onResume(). The pointe here is that the dialog does not cover the full screen and therefore leaves part of the main activity visible. It's a detail but it does matter!

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Great piece of detail. +1. –  Android Eve Apr 21 '11 at 15:12
    
Nice "Real life" example. Thanks. –  OferR Dec 3 '11 at 7:03

onResume() is called:

  1. after onStart()
  2. when the activity comes to the foreground.

From http://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/Activity.html#ActivityLifecycle: alt text

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Note that there are things that happen between the calls to onStart() and onResume(). Namely, onNewIntent(), which I've painfully found out.

If you are using the SINGLE_TOP flag, and you send some data to your activity, using intent extras, you will be able to access it only in onNewIntent(), which is called after onStart() and before onResume(). So usually, you will take the new (maybe only modified) data from the extras and set it to some class members, or use setIntent() to set the new intent as the original activity intent and process the data in onResume().

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