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We are used to saying that HashMap get/put operations are O(1). However it depends on the hash implementation. The default object hash is actually the internal address in the JVM heap. Are we sure it is good enough to claim that the get/put are O(1) ?

Available memory is another issue. As I understand from the javadocs, the HashMap load factor should be 0.75. What if we do not have enough memory in JVM and the load factor exceeds the limit ?

So, it looks like O(1) is not guaranteed. Does it make sense or am I missing something ?

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You might want to look up the concept of amortized complexity. See for instance here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3949217/time-complexity-of-hash-table Worst case complexity is not the most important measure for a hash table –  Dr G Dec 29 '10 at 12:20
    
Correct -- it's amortized O(1) -- never forget that first part and you won't have these kinds of questions :) –  Nick Wiggill Jan 3 at 10:52
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2 Answers

up vote 31 down vote accepted

It depends on many things. It's usually O(1), with a decent hash which itself is constant time... but you could have a hash which takes a long time to compute, and if there are multiple items in the hash map which return the same hash code, get will have to iterate over them calling equals on each of them to find a match.

In the worst case, a HashMap has an O(n) lookup. Fortunately, that worst case scenario doesn't come up very often in real life, in my experience. So no, O(1) certainly isn't guaranteed - but it's usually what you should assume when considering which algorithms and data structures to use.

And yes, if you don't have enough memory for the hash map, you'll be in trouble... but that's going to be true whatever data structure you use.

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@marcog: You assume O(n log n) for a single lookup? That sounds daft to me. It will depend on the complexity of the hash and equality functions, of course, but that's unlikely to depend on the size of the map. –  Jon Skeet Dec 29 '10 at 11:29
    
@marcog: So what are you assuming to be O(n log n)? Insertion of n items? –  Jon Skeet Dec 29 '10 at 11:40
    
Forget about it. This is a bit of aggravation from disagreement on a related question. I'm just being silly. Your answer is great for this question. +1 –  marcog Dec 29 '10 at 11:49
    
+1 for a good answer. Would you please provide links like this wikipedia entry for hash table in your answer? That way, the more interested reader could get to the nitty gritty of understanding why you gave your answer. –  Davidann Dec 29 '10 at 15:19
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I'm not sure the default hashcode is the address - I read the OpenJDK source for hashcode generation a while ago, and I remember it being something a bit more complicated. Still not something that guarantees a good distribution, perhaps. However, that is to some extent moot, as few classes you'd use as keys in a hashmap use the default hashcode - they supply their own implementations, which ought to be good.

On top of that, what you may not know (again, this is based in reading source - it's not guaranteed) is that HashMap stirs the hash before using it, to mix entropy from throughout the word into the bottom bits, which is where it's needed for all but the hugest hashmaps. That helps deal with hashes that specifically don't do that themselves, although i can't think of any common cases where you'd see that.

Finally, what happens when the table is overloaded is that it degenerates into a set of parallel linked lists - performance becomes O(n). Specifically, the number of links traversed will on average be half the load factor.

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Dammit. I choose to believe that if I hadn't had to type this on a flipping mobile phone touchscreen, I could have beaten Jon Sheet to the punch. There's a badge for that, right? –  Tom Anderson Dec 29 '10 at 11:55
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