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I'm building a game in c# which allows you to script your own level, although I have come across a bit of a thought.

I have a base class called "World" as an object. This was made with a simple:

class World {

However, when the user is scripting their level, all of the game objects will be contained in the world object. I want them to be able to do something on the lines of:

World.ParentObjectName.ParentObjectProperty = "abc";

I know that the System.Windows.Forms.Panel and other classes are like containers and can have objects in them and be accessed in that kind of way... my question is how can I make a class which is like a container in which I can add objects to, and then access them with a World.ObjectName

I have tried class World : System.Collections.CollectionBase, but with this method, I have to keep typing World.Item("ObjectName")

Can anyone help?

Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Best you can do is add indexer like this:

public string this[string name]
{
    get
    {
        return this.Item(name);
    }
}

Assuming Item() is already working, and call it like this:

string value = world["ObjectName"];
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Thanks, I tried this and it works well. But is there any way to be able to do world.ObjectName because surely it's possible because System.Windows.Forms.Panel manages to do it! –  Jamie Dec 29 '10 at 11:48
    
When you add a control to a parent control in design time, a field is added to the parent control. This is done at design time - before compiling. You can do this with objects with an application long life time, but if your objects are added at run time, this is not possible (unless you perform code generation and compilation at run time - which is not appropriate for this case). –  Danny Varod Dec 29 '10 at 12:05
    
@Jamie: not possible as others said already. If you want to have it "strongly typed" i.e. avoid typing string which might have typo, you can use enum in the calling code, e.g. string value = world[PossibleNames.ObjectName.ToString()]; –  Shadow Wizard Dec 29 '10 at 12:28

Unfortunately, System.Windows.Forms.Panel is not actually able to do that, and neither will you. Concerning the Windows Forms case, what happens is that the corresponding properties are auto-generated on a class that's derived from Panel. This means that there will indeed be named properties for the controls you added via the designer; however, that was based on information available at design-/compile-time. Note that if you add controls dynamically AT RUNTIME in a Windows Forms application, no corresponding properties will magically appear on the Panel object (though they will be accessible through a regular collection interface). This auto-generation of accessors may give the impression that there's something special about Panel, but there really isn't.

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Thanks for the information. I suppose what I could do is add the indexer, but when you save the script in my game, it replaces World.Object1 to make it World["Object1"], so the person making the level can use World.Object1 but it's actually executing World["Object1"]. Do you think this is a good idea? –  Jamie Dec 29 '10 at 14:05
    
Jamie, can't really tell since we don't know much about your system; are you directly exposing C# to your level creators as a scripting language, or do you let them create the level through some other means and only generate C# code from that in the background? Didn't quite understand that part, sorry. In the former case, I'd probably shy away from introducing code auto-generation, since that can become quite expensive to implement and maintain. But that's mostly gut feeling, I don't think I'm qualified to comment too strongly on this. –  ig2r Dec 29 '10 at 15:07
    
I'm using LuaInterface to give the level creators Lua. I use a simple RegisterFunction to register a C# function which creates the class, and returns it. Therefore, they can create game objects/classes in Lua. –  Jamie Dec 29 '10 at 15:41

You need to add public properties to your World class. Those public properties expose private fields of that class so that you can set them from code outside of the class itself.

For example, your World could look like this:

class World
{
    private string _ObjectName;

    public string ObjectName
    {
        get 
        {
           return _ObjectName; 
        }
        set 
        {
           _ObjectName= value; 
        }
    }
}

And then you could write code that looked like the following:

World myWorld = new World();
myWorld.ObjectName = "Home World";


For more information, read through this tutorial on adding properties to classes in C#, and the more recently updated C# Programming Guide concerning properties.

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But in the IntelliSense in Visual Studio, wouldn't that just show up as a property, not an object. Also, how would I get that to be dynamic, so let's say half way through a level another object is added to the World object, how could I access that with World.Object as a property? Thanks –  Jamie Dec 29 '10 at 11:55
    
@Jamie: You gave the example of System.Windows.Forms.Panel having the behavior that you wanted to achieve. I'm not aware of it dynamically exposing properties. And you could expose an object (any class of your choosing, custom or otherwise, with its own members and properties) as a property, not just one of the standard data types. –  Cody Gray Dec 29 '10 at 11:58

First off, in System.Windows.Forms.Panel, System.Windows.Forms part is just the namespace and Panel is the class.

Another way to get the objects displayed in the pattern that you suggest, would happen if you declare the classes as static in your world class.

class World
        {
            public static class ParentObject
            {
                public static int memberX;
            }
        }

Then you can use them directly with the class name as

 World.ParentObject.memberX = 10;

But, I still dont think that this would be a feasible solution for you.

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When designing Forms, Panels, etc. Visual Studio generates code for each item you drag onto the design view. You can find this auto-generated code in xxx.designer.cs files. It is this feature of Visual Studio that you want, not of Form or Panel class.

You would have to perform code generation (as Shadow Wizard put it) to achieve the same thing. Otherwise it is not possible, at least in my knowledge.

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