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As we know in C++ we have class iostream, which is inherited from istream(basic_istream) and ostream (basic_ostream). In every C++ book you can find, that with iostream class object you can read and write to the same stream. But I realy haven't see any explanation or example to understand why should I use such a strange think. I really don't know why should I need to write to some stream and than read from it :(.

Could you explain me when I should need such construction? I think there must be serous reason for using such construction(don't forget that only for iostream declaration we are using virtual inheritance and multiple inheritance).

Also when I try to write a simple code, which is using fsteram(derivative of iostream) I find, that its not working in way, which I expect. Here is my code:

#include <fstream>
using namespace std;
int  main()
{
    fstream fstr("somefile.txt",fstream::in|fstream::out);//fstream is deriveted from iosteram
    int n;
    fstr>>n;//reading n (WORKS FINE !!!).

    fstr.flush();

    //trying to print Hello to the same file
    fstr<<"Hello"<<endl;// NOT WORKING!!!!!!!

    fstr.flush();

    return 0;
}

So could you tell me why this code can read from file and can't write something to it????

Resume: Please tell me why we need class iosteram and why isteram and ostream arn't enought and how to use it.

Thanks and sorry for my english :).

P.S. Probably this question is to primitive, but please answer me.

Edit: My code is now working. Thanks to Murka.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You might want to read from and write to the same stream because the stream performs type conversions, like std::stringstream. You could also have iostream abstractions over data sources that permit both reading and writing- such as a socket or an in-memory buffer.

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Ok, than could you explain why I need fstream and what I'm doing wrong in my code? –  UmmaGumma Dec 29 '10 at 12:19
    
@Ashot: If you want to ask about iostream in general, open one question. If you want to ask about specific code with fstream, open another question. The two aren't related. –  Puppy Dec 29 '10 at 12:57

IIRC you need to do a seek before you can write, don't ask why. Also added code to clear any flags it might raise.

#include <fstream>
using namespace std;
int  main()
{
    fstream fstr("somefile.txt",fstream::in|fstream::out);//fstream is deriveted from iosteram
    int n;
    fstr>>n;//reading n (WORKS FINE !!!).

    fstr.clear();     //Clear any errors, eof, etc.
    fstr.seekg(0, ios::beg);  //Seek to beginning of file
    fstr.flush();

    //trying to print Hello to the same file
    fstr<<"Hello"<<endl;// NOW WORKS!!!

    fstr.flush();

    return 0;
}
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O, thanks it's finally working :). –  UmmaGumma Dec 29 '10 at 13:07

why should i need ability to read and write to the file at the same time?

You might need that ability for a program that updates or edits an existing file: it must read what is already present, to locate the part to be updated or edited, and must write the update (alteration) to the file.

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Ok, than could you tell me what I'm doing wrong in my example? Also don't you think that having 2 objects ifstream and ofstream more logical. And if it's a explanation than, I think that fstream is unneeded. Maybe iostream isn't usless becouse using sockets as a streams sounds good to me but in case of files I think using ifstream and ofstream are much better –  UmmaGumma Dec 29 '10 at 12:53

when I should need such construction

Rarely. See my answer here: Is fstream better than iostream in C++?

Edited: If you don't think you need it, you don't need it.

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@Readwald. Ok, I also think, that in your example it's better to write std::istream or std::ostream, but my question is why should i need ability to read and write to the file at the same time? –  UmmaGumma Dec 29 '10 at 12:09

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