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I've googled for JUnit test case, and it comes up with something that looks a lot more complicated to implement - where you have to create a new class that extends test case which you then call:

public class MathTest extends TestCase {
    protected double fValue1;
    protected double fValue2;

    protected void setUp() {
       fValue1= 2.0;
       fValue2= 3.0;
    }
 }

public void testAdd() {
   double result= fValue1 + fValue2;
   assertTrue(result == 5.0);
}

but what I want is something really simple, like the NUnit test cases

[TestCase(1,2)]
[TestCase(3,4)]
public void testAdd(int fValue1, int fValue2)
{
    double result= fValue1 + fValue2;
    assertIsTrue(result == 5.0);
}

Is there any way to do this in JUnit?

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2  
JUnit has two styles: version 3, which you have in your example, and version 4, which uses annotations. Do you really want to know about version 3? –  Raedwald Dec 29 '10 at 12:41
    
Ah.. No...I want to know about 4.5... –  Steph Dec 29 '10 at 13:51
1  
I think what I might be looking for is Parameterised Tests. But even this looks a bit verbose and a little bit random... mkyong.com/unittest/junit-4-tutorial-6-parameterized-test –  Steph Dec 29 '10 at 13:53
2  
looks like you can only have 1 parameterised test per class. Shit or what? –  Steph Dec 29 '10 at 13:56
    
you can use kentbeck.github.com/junit/javadoc/latest/org/junit/experimental/… to put multiple test classes in one class, which would allow you to have multiple parameterized tests per class. –  NamshubWriter Jan 2 '11 at 15:06

5 Answers 5

It might also be worthwhile to check out JUnit Theories and Datapoints. They let you parametrize tests, but run an all-pairs type combination on your inputs.

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JUnitParams (http://code.google.com/p/junitparams/) seems like a decent alternative. It allows you to specify test parameters as strings, like this:

@RunWith(JUnitParamsRunner.class)
public class MyTestSuite {
    @Test
    @Parameters({"1,2", "3,4"})
    public testAdd(int fValue1, int fValue2) {
       ...
    }
}

You can also specify parameters through separate methods, classes or files, consult the JUnitParamsRunner api docs for details.

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It's silly but here is the workaround that I have in the end. Use 4 lines instead one line.

@Test
public void testAdd1() {
    testAdd(1,2);
}
@Test
public void testAdd2() {
    testAdd(3,4);
}
private void testAdd(int fValue1, int fValue2)
{
    double result= fValue1 + fValue2;
    assertIsTrue(result == 5.0);
}
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Apparently the correct answer is "No, there is no equivalent." And that's sad.

JUnit parameterized tests and theories (as mentioned here and in JUnit - Hot to test a method with different values?) both can get the job done, but nowhere nearly as cleanly. They are sadly complicated to write, and hard to read.

I hope that one day JUnit can add an easier, NUnit-like syntax. Seems like it shouldn't be that difficult; though perhaps lambdas are needed?

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Lambdas are probably not needed as much as proper generics, but that's only a guess here. Annotations/Attributes don't depend on anonymous functions at all. –  Joey Sep 10 '13 at 6:50

Try this: https://code.google.com/p/zohhak/

Usage example:

@RunWith(ZohhakRunner.class)
public class HelloWorldTest {

    @TestWith({
        "2, 1,   3",
        "3, 5,   8"
    })
    public void should_add_numbers(int addend1, int addend2, int result) {

        assertThat(addend1 + addend2).isEqualTo(result);
    }
}
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