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function myFunction(messager) {
    this.message = messager;
}
new myFunction("Hello");
document.write(myFunction.message);
share|improve this question
1  
myFunction.message works if you write myFunction.message = 'Hello' instead of new ..... But there is really no point in doing that. – Felix Kling Dec 29 '10 at 12:44
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You were trying to reference a member of the function object itself, which is totally incorrect.

When using this in conjunction with the new keyword, this will refer to the object instance which is implicitly returned from the constructor function.

This code should work:

function myFunction(messager) {
    this.message = messager;
}
var obj = new myFunction("Hello");
document.write(obj.message);

You can also use the prototype member to augment member functions and variables onto the created objects:

myFunction.prototype.doSomething = function() {
   alert('Hello ' + this.message);
}

obj.doSomething(); //alerts "Hello Hello"
share|improve this answer

You need to create a new instance and use that instead:

function myFunction(messager)
{
    this.message = messager;
}

var mf = new myFunction("Hello");
document.write(mf.message);
share|improve this answer

The new keyword causes this to refer to the instance of the object and not to the constructor function.

function myFunction(messager) {
    this.message = messager;
}
var instance = new myFunction("Hello");
document.write(instance.message);
share|improve this answer

There're already excellent answers so I'll just provide a simple one. This code creates an instance but doesn't store it anywhere:

new myFunction("Hello");
share|improve this answer

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