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public void foo() {
 begin();
 try {
  ...
  commit();
 } catch (Exception e) {
  rollback();
  throw e;
 }
}

In the sample above, there is an error because foo has no throws Exception. Adding that wouldn't make do the method's usability a lot of good either.

What's the best way to do this? How do you do something if an error occurs without really "handling" the error?

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Why not rethrow the a non-checked exception like throw new RuntimeException(e)? –  dacwe Dec 29 '10 at 12:53
3  
@dacwe: -gak- If the code doesn't handle the checked exception, it shouldn't lie in its signature by hiding it in a runtime exception. Handle it, or declare that you're not handling it, but don't hide it. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 29 '10 at 13:00
    
@T.J. Crowder: What if it is like Integer.parseInt(..) then? Well, I see your point - I would change the signature of the method! :) –  dacwe Dec 29 '10 at 13:19

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

At least two approaches come to mind, which are usually going to be combined depending on what you want foo to do:

1. Catch and rethrow only the relevant exceptions

There are only so many exceptions the code in your main flow can throw (probably mostly SqlExceptions). So only catch and rethrow those, and declare that you're doing so. More to the point, rethrow only the ones you're not actually handling (in your simplified sample code, you're not handling any, but your real life code is probably more subtle).

Mind you, some of the exceptions may be runtime exceptions, and so you may want to combine this with the below.

2. Don't catch the exception at all

Like this:

// Signature changes to include any exceptions that really can be thrown
public void foo() throws XYZException, ABCException {
 // A flag indicating that the commit succeeded
 boolean done = false;

 begin();
 try {
  // Don't have any `return` statements in here (or if you do,
  // set `done` to `true` first)

  ...
  commit();
  done = true; // Commit didn't throw an exception, we're done
 } finally {
  // finally clause always happens regardless
  if (!done) {
    // We must be processing an exception; rollback
    try {
      rollback();
    } catch (Exception e) {
      // quash it (e.g., leave this block empty), we don't want
      // to mask the real exception by throwing a different one
    }
  }
 }
}

Naturally your signature needs to include any exceptions that may be thrown in the main flow, but that's what you're trying to do, if I'm understanding you correctly.

Again, you may well combine these two approaches, because you may want to handle some exceptions and not others.

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I'm no fan on #1 because one can never be really sure which runtime exceptions will be thrown. #2 however, is more what I'm looking for, despite being a bit verbose. It would be convenient if Java had a built-in mechanism to find out whether you got into a finally block normally or via an exception. –  Bart van Heukelom Dec 29 '10 at 13:10
    
@Bart: Agreed about runtime exceptions, that's why I added that sentence to the end of #1 (should have been there when you read, but you may have been reading a stale page -- in any case, it's there now). Re verbosity: I usually have a function to call for silent rollback, so I don't have to write all that stuff every time. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Dec 29 '10 at 13:19
    
In this case you will have foo() throws SQLException. Is it a good idea to expose SQLException to the upper level? –  Petar Minchev Dec 29 '10 at 13:30
    
@Petar: It depends on what layer foo is in. As I said in #1, "More to the point, rethrow only the ones you're not actually handling..." Just edited to emphasize that the approaches can and frequently will be combined. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 29 '10 at 13:31

Adding that wouldn't make do the method's usability a lot of good either.

No. It will be good at documentation, also caller will take care handling it.

Also See

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but for api methods the user may not allways want to catch an exception which is very unlikely to be thrown. you may rethrow checked exceptions wrapped up as unchecked exceptions and still add the throws clause to the method. so the exception is documeneted without forcing the user to catch it –  Gerhard Presser Dec 29 '10 at 12:59

Wrap it with some RuntimeException which is unchecked.

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2  
-gak- Strongly disagree, don't turn checked exceptions into runtime exceptions. Handle the exception or don't, but don't convert it. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 29 '10 at 12:59
    
Why? Every exception can have a root cause: you won't lose any information, you just avoid all that "checked boilerplate" –  thermz Mar 31 at 15:55

You can rethrow a checked exception, but only by avoiding the compilers checked exception validation.

public void foo() throws MyCheckedException {
 begin();
 try {
  ...
  commit();
 } catch (Exception e) {
  rollback();
  // same as throwing an exception without the compiler knowing.
  Thread.currentThread().stop(e); 
 }
}

Before you use stop() you should read http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/guides/concurrency/threadPrimitiveDeprecation.html

Thread.currentThread().stop(e) .. is behaviorally identical to Java's throw operation, but circumvents the compiler's attempts to guarantee that the calling method has declared all of the checked exceptions that it may throw:

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I'd say that in this case rolling back is handling the exception appropriately. It's one of the few cases where it's legitimate to catch and re-throw.

Simply catching and logging an exception is not what I would consider handling. Rather than rethrowing, in that case I'd rather see checked exceptions added to the method signature and let it bubble up.

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you may throw a subclass of RuntimeException - they don't require a catch()

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the key point is, why should you throw a new Exception from a catch block. if you use catch then handle your exception there in your catch. If you have to inform the caller method with an exception, then don't catch the exception with try-catch, instead, sign your method with throws and let the caller catch the e xception.

or throw a RuntimeException, i find this idea less useful because of lack of readability, then you don't need to sign your method with throws.

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by using a try/catch-block you can react on the exception and e.g. roll back your transaction. rethrowing the exception afterwards is legal to notify the caller of the method that something happened. the caller may not know what to do to undo the method's work –  Gerhard Presser Dec 29 '10 at 13:03
    
to rollback finally-block is a better place than the catch. –  Erhan Bagdemir Dec 29 '10 at 13:07
    
why? a catch-block is intended to react on exceptions!? –  Gerhard Presser Dec 29 '10 at 13:14
    
you change the need of catching of an exception with converting it from a catchable Exception to the Runtime- Exception. It can cause side-effects in libraries. How can the caller (client) of a method (foo in this case) which calls in try-catch "public void begin() throws CanNotBeginException;" method know that the method throws an exception if the client has no source of method and add try-catch block to handle the exception? –  Erhan Bagdemir Dec 29 '10 at 13:32

Here you've chanced on one of the biggest religious schisms in the Java, ( if not wider ) , world. It boils down to those that feel, as TJ seems to, and I do too, that checked exceptions are valuable for many reasons, VS the Rod Johnson/Spring school that in the design of Java, checked exceptions were used in many instances where they shouldn't, say closing a resultset or socket, so because it was wrongly used in many cases, it makes them useless so all exceptions should be unchecked. There are many classes in the Spring framework that are very thin wrappers around standard Java objects, but convert checked exceptions to unchecked. It drives me berserk!

Anyway, put me down as strongly agreeing with everything TJ has said, but know that you'll probably never find a "right" answer.

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The main "problem" with Java's checked exceptions is the lack of a concise syntax to indicate that a called method isn't expected to throw certain (or any) exceptions. If even 25% of a method's callers would be interested in catching a particular exception, having it as a checked exception would be semantically advantageous, but for the fact that it would force a few lines of code bloat on each of the 75% of callers that weren't interested in it. As it is, checked exceptions are more of a hindrance than a help unless 90%+ of callers will be interested. –  supercat Jun 13 '13 at 19:26
    
I do agree with what you're saying, but I've also had to take over code that was written with Spring and unchecked exceptions, where the original author felt it necessary to implement a lot of his business logic in unchecked exceptions, years later we're STILL finding small libraries that were used throwing exceptions we had no idea might be tripped across. –  mezmo Jun 18 '13 at 14:36
    
The problem there I think is that there isn't with checked exceptions or a lack thereof, but rather with an exception hierarchy that doesn't distinguish between "Method failed with no side-effects; object appears undamaged" and "CPU is on fire". Any exception thrown by myDocument = SomeDocumentClass.LoadDocument(filename); will, at minimum, have the effect that myDocument won't get loaded; if the caller can deal with that, it should consider itself prepared to handle all exceptions where that is the only effect/implication, whether or not it anticipated the particular reason for failure. –  supercat Jun 18 '13 at 14:50
    
Actually, what I'd like to see in a language/framework would be an exception object with a virtual IsResolved() method. After executing each catch, the system would check IsResolved() and--if it returned false, automatically rethrow the exception. Such a thing would allow code to safely handle exceptions that weren't particularly anticipated, since exceptions would only be stifled by code that should catch them. I'd also like to see more use of fault blocks (which are somewhat like catch, except that exceptions are guaranteed to be rethrown). –  supercat Jun 18 '13 at 14:59

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