Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am implementing a countdown timer. I have a TextBlock which is showing the time, using DispatcherTimer.

I would like to create an animation for that TextBlock's FontSize property. I want its value to increase to 300pt at the point the timer shows 9pm. So, it starts with FontSize 8pt whenever the application is run and it keeps increasing and when the real time hits 9pm the FontSize should be 300pt.

Here's how I pictured it: Once the application is run, it will calculate the number of seconds it takes from that moment to get to 9pm; the result will be the stored by the variable timeToGetTo9pm. The problem I am facing is that when I create an animation in XAML, I don't know how to set timeToGetTo9pm to the animation Duration property.

Any ideas? Also, if my approach is stupid or confusing, please feel free to recommend a better one. Thanks.

Delegate body:

private void dispatcherTimer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    DateTime currentTime;
    double timeToNewYearInMiliseconds;

    currentTime = DateTime.Now;

    //targetTime is a DateTime object set elsewhere, 
    //It represents the 9pm mentioned in the question body
    if (DateTime.Compare(targetTime, currentTime) > 0)
    {
        timeToNewYearInMiliseconds = targetTime.Subtract(currentTime).TotalMilliseconds;
        percent = 100 / timeToNewYearInMiliseconds;
        PercentageComplete = percent;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
chibacity has definitely provided a way out. And even though it does solve my case, I would still like to learn how to use a variable from code as property value in XAML. –  Boris Dec 29 '10 at 14:01
    
@Borris I have updated my answer with example code of using a property from the code-behind in xaml. –  Tim Lloyd Dec 29 '10 at 14:18
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why not have a 'TimerFontSize' property in your ViewModel\Code-Behind and bind the TextBox's FontSize to it.

FontSize="{Binding TimerFontSize, Mode=OneWay}"

As your timer ticks, re-calculate the font size and set the 'TimerFontSize' property. If you have implemented INotifyPropertyChanged for 'TimerFontSize' the TextBox binding will automatically update and change the size of the font.

This pattern will use your timer, plus data-binding, to drive the animation.

Update

I see what you mean re. separating visual representation from data representation. My suggestion is the easy way. You could clean it up by making the exposed property an elapsed time or countdown value, and then use a ValueConverter to get a FontSize. This would separate data and view concepts.

Here's a code example of exposing a property in your code-behind. Simply use the binding I previously detailed to hook it up. Ideally you would refactor the code into a ViewModel class rather than have it in the code-behind, just taking things one step-at-a-time.

public partial class TimerView : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    private double _fontSize;
    private readonly DispatcherTimer _timer;

    public TimerView()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        _timer = new DispatcherTimer { Interval = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1) };
        _timer.Tick += delegate {/*calculate font size and set TimerFontSize*/};
        _timer.Start();
    }

    public double TimerFontSize
    {
        get { return _fontSize; }
        private set
        {
            _fontSize = value;
            InvokePropertyChanged("TimerFontSize");
        }
    }

    private void InvokePropertyChanged(string name)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
        }
    }        
}

Update 2

And to separate model representation from view representation use a ValueConverter, e.g.:

Binding:

FontSize="{Binding PercentageComplete,
                   Mode=OneWay,
                   Converter={StaticResource percentToFontSizeConverter}}"

ValueConverter:

public class PercentToFontSizeValueConverter : IValueConverter
{
    private static double _DpiX;

    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        double percent = (double)value;
        double fontPointSize = (percent * 300);
        double fontDpiSize = (fontPointSize * (DpiX / 72d));
        return fontDpiSize;
    }

    private static double DpiX
    {
        get
        {
            if (_DpiX == 0)
            {
                Matrix m = PresentationSource.
                           FromVisual(Application.Current.MainWindow).
                           CompositionTarget.
                           TransformToDevice;

                _DpiX = (m.M11 * 96d);
            }

            return _DpiX;
        }
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

Code-Behind:

public partial class TimerView : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    private double _percent;
    private readonly DispatcherTimer _timer;

    public TimerView()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        _timer = new DispatcherTimer { Interval = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1) };
        _timer.Tick += delegate{/*Calulate perecent and set PercentageComplete */};
        _timer.Start();
    }

    public double PercentageComplete
    {
        get { return _percent; }
        private set
        {
            _percent = value;
            InvokePropertyChanged("PercentageComplete");
        }
    }

    private void InvokePropertyChanged(string name)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. If nothing better turns up, I'll do as you suggested. My goal was to separate the logic of changing the time from the animations and styles in general. Either way, I still don't know how to use a variable from code as property value in XAML. –  Boris Dec 29 '10 at 13:59
    
@Borris I have updated my answer with example code of using a property from the code-behind in xaml. –  Tim Lloyd Dec 29 '10 at 14:17
    
@Borris I had my Font Point-to-DPI size calculation the wrong way around - the code is now updated and correct. –  Tim Lloyd Dec 29 '10 at 14:58
    
@chibacity Thank you so much, now I understand what you are aiming for. Still, the font won't increase. I implemented everything you've written and additionally written the delegate body. I added that code in my question. Can you tell me what am I doing wrong? Thanks. –  Boris Dec 29 '10 at 22:33
    
@Boris The calculation for the percentage value looks off as it appears to create an extremely small value. Add some logging statements to check this value as it is updated. Also add some logging to the ValueConverter to check that it is being triggered and what value it is returning. Some simple Console.WriteLines will do the job for logging. –  Tim Lloyd Dec 29 '10 at 22:59
show 7 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.