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I have a previous question which I have provided my solution; however, I don't have access to ConcurrentQueue<T> since I am on .Net 3.5. I need Queue<T> to allow concurrency. I read this question and seems to present a problem if an item is not in the queue and the threaded method tries to dequeue an item.

My task now is to determine whether I can derive my own concurrent Queue class. This is what I came up with:

public sealed class ConcurrentQueue : Queue<DataTable>
{
    public event EventHandler<TableQueuedEventArgs> TableQueued;
    private ICollection que;

    new public void Enqueue(DataTable Table)
    {
        lock (que.SyncRoot)
        {
            base.Enqueue(Table);
        }

        OnTableQueued(new TableQueuedEventArgs(Dequeue()));
    }

    //  this is where I think I will have a problem...
    new public DataTable Dequeue()
    {
        DataTable table;

        lock (que.SyncRoot)
        {
            table = base.Dequeue();
        }

        return table;
    }

    public void OnTableQueued(TableQueuedEventArgs table)
    {
        EventHandler<TableQueuedEventArgs> handler = TableQueued;

        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, table);
        }
    }
}

So, when a DataTable is queued, the EventArgs will pass a dequeued table to the event subscriber. Will this implementation provide me with a thread-safe Queue?

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3  
que is utterly useless. You should lock on a readonly object key = new object();. –  SLaks Dec 29 '10 at 15:24
    
@SLaks: I implemented ICollection que and lock(que.SyncRoot) based on MSDN: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb344892.aspx –  IAbstract Dec 29 '10 at 16:43
    
You don't need it at all. SyncRoot is useful if you have disjoint pieces of code that need to lock for the same collection. In your case, que is null. You just need to lock on a single object in your methods. –  SLaks Dec 29 '10 at 16:44
    
I can't see why you are trying to use a queue here, as it de-queues immediately on the same thread. If you want to have worker threads handle de-queuing, you can use a producer/consumer queue pattern. There are many examples on SO. Also, I assume this throws nullreference exception as soon as you enqueue. –  dashton Dec 29 '10 at 17:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're dequeueing your items as you enqueue them.
You need to raise the event using your parameter.

Whether it's actually thread-safe depends on how you use it.
If you ever check the Count or check for emptiness, it's not threadsafe and cannot easily be made threadsafe.
If you don't, you can probably use something simpler than a queue.

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The enqueueing is expected to be faster than the dequeueing (however, I don't have any data yet to confirm either way). Enqueueing is also performed on the main thread. When the event fires, I use an action BeginInvoke to run the dequeuing process asynchronously. –  IAbstract Dec 29 '10 at 16:39
    
Also...I don't ever check Count and didn't see a need to do so since I am dequeuing almost immediately on a worker thread. I don't know what would be simpler than a Queue<T> unless I went to a List<T> - which I almost did, but the Queue<T> class seemed to have everything I would need except, of course, for the event when an item is queued. –  IAbstract Dec 29 '10 at 16:51
    
It looks like you don't need a queue at all; you can just pass the table as a parameter to BeginInvoke. –  SLaks Dec 29 '10 at 16:58

A quick trip to my favorite search engine revealed that my memory was correct; you can get the Task Parallel Library even on .NET 3.5. Also see The PFX team blog post on the subject, and the Reactive Extensions that you download in order to get at the desired System.Threading.dll.

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Unfortunately, I am bound (by internal policy) to the basic libraries used in .Net 3.5 - basically keeping all developers using the same libraries. If I try to use TPLib, I'll be marked as a rogue. Otherwise, a good option. –  IAbstract Dec 29 '10 at 16:59
3  
That's an insane policy. Re-inventing the wheel is one of the worst productivity drains, and a great source of bugs. –  SLaks Dec 29 '10 at 17:24
2  
This kind of policy is usually enforced by people who know nothing about programming... –  Thomas Levesque Dec 29 '10 at 21:00
1  
Actually, the policy makes sense when the CTP is no longer available and the reactive extensions are unsupported . –  IAbstract Jan 14 '11 at 16:11

The fact you need to use new to hide methods from the base class is usually an indication that you should use composition rather than inheritance...

Here's a simple synchronized queue, which doesn't use inheritance but still relies on the behavior of the standard Queue<T>:

public class ConcurrentQueue<T> : ICollection, IEnumerable<T>
{
    private readonly Queue<T> _queue;

    public ConcurrentQueue()
    {
        _queue = new Queue<T>();
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        lock (SyncRoot)
        {
            foreach (var item in _queue)
            {
                yield return item;
            }
        }
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

    public void CopyTo(Array array, int index)
    {
        lock (SyncRoot)
        {
            ((ICollection)_queue).CopyTo(array, index);
        }
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get
        { 
            // Assumed to be atomic, so locking is unnecessary
            return _queue.Count;
        }
    }

    public object SyncRoot
    {
        get { return ((ICollection)_queue).SyncRoot; }
    }

    public bool IsSynchronized
    {
        get { return true; }
    }

    public void Enqueue(T item)
    {
        lock (SyncRoot)
        {
            _queue.Enqueue(item);
        }
    }

    public T Dequeue()
    {
        lock(SyncRoot)
        {
            return _queue.Dequeue();
        }
    }

    public T Peek()
    {
        lock (SyncRoot)
        {
            return _queue.Peek();
        }
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        lock (SyncRoot)
        {
            _queue.Clear();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What for explicit interface implementation and cast onto _queue? –  abatishchev Dec 29 '10 at 15:51
1  
lock-ing in an iterator is dangerous. –  SLaks Dec 29 '10 at 16:17
1  
Also, this is still not threadsafe in most use-cases. –  SLaks Dec 29 '10 at 16:18
1  
@dboarman, it's ok as long as you use your class through a variable of this type. But if you use it through a variable of type Queue<T>, your new methods won't be called –  Thomas Levesque Dec 29 '10 at 20:59
1  
@Thomas: The lock will only be released when you Dispose() the iterator's IEnumerator<T>. stackoverflow.com/questions/2274664/… –  SLaks Dec 29 '10 at 21:12

In the line OnTableQueued(new TableQueuedEventArgs(Dequeue())); in your Enqueue method

use Peek instead of Dequeue

It should be

OnTableQueued(new TableQueuedEventArgs(base.Peek()));

share|improve this answer
    
That's not thread-safe. You have a parameter; use it! –  SLaks Dec 29 '10 at 16:18

Some time after the initial question, I know (this came up as "related" to the right of another question), but I've gone with the following in similar cases. Not as good for CPU-cache-use as it could be, but simple, lock-free, thread-safe, and often CPU-cache-use isn't that important if there'd often be large gaps between operations, and when not the closeness of allocation might reduce the impact:

internal sealed class LockFreeQueue<T>
{
  private sealed class Node
  {
    public readonly T Item;
    public Node Next;
    public Node(T item)
    {
      Item = item;
    }
  }
  private volatile Node _head;
  private volatile Node _tail;
  public LockFreeQueue()
  {
    _head = _tail = new Node(default(T));
  }
#pragma warning disable 420 // volatile semantics not lost as only by-ref calls are interlocked
  public void Enqueue(T item)
  {
    Node newNode = new Node(item);
    for(;;)
    {
      Node curTail = _tail;
      if (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref curTail.Next, newNode, null) == null)   //append to the tail if it is indeed the tail.
      {
        Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _tail, newNode, curTail);   //CAS in case we were assisted by an obstructed thread.
        return;
      }
      else
      {
        Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _tail, curTail.Next, curTail);  //assist obstructing thread.
      }
    }
  }    
  public bool TryDequeue(out T item)
  {
    for(;;)
    {
      Node curHead = _head;
      Node curTail = _tail;
      Node curHeadNext = curHead.Next;
      if (curHead == curTail)
      {
        if (curHeadNext == null)
        {
          item = default(T);
          return false;
        }
        else
          Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _tail, curHeadNext, curTail);   // assist obstructing thread
      }
      else
      {
        item = curHeadNext.Item;
        if (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _head, curHeadNext, curHead) == curHead)
        {
          return true;
        }
      }
    }
  }
#pragma warning restore 420
}
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