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I want to set a user control property to the value of a property in a parent control. For example, let's say my main window control has some initial configuration data. Currently I use the following in XAML:

<Window x:Class="MyProject.MainWindow"
        x:Name="TopWindow" ... >
  ...
  <local:MyUserControl Config="{Binding ElementName=TopWindow,
                                Path=MyUserControlConfig, Mode=OneTime}" />
</Window>

But this appears to require two dependency properties, one in the MainWindow (MyUserControlConfig):

namespace MyProject
{
  public partial class MainWindow: Window
  {
    public static readonly DependencyProperty MyUserControlConfigProperty=
      DependencyProperty.Register("MyUserControlConfig", 
        typeof(UserControlConfig), typeof(MainWindow));

    public UserControlConfig MyUserControlConfig
    {
      get { return (UserControlConfig) 
        GetValue(MyUserControlConfigProperty); }
      set { SetValue(MyUserControlConfigProperty, value); }
    }    
  }
}

and one in MyUserControl (Config):

namespace MyProject
{
  public partial class MyUserControl: UserControl
  {
    public static readonly DependencyProperty ConfigProperty=
      DependencyProperty.Register("Config", 
      typeof(UserControlConfig), typeof(MainWindow));

    public UserControlConfig Config
    {
      get { return (UserControlConfig) GetValue(ConfigProperty); }
      set { SetValue(ConfigProperty, value); }
    }    
  }
}

I really don't need to observe any changes, just to pass data into my user control at the time of creation. Is this possible to do using simple properties for at least one of the two or must I use two dependency properties to perform this (one time) initialization?

Update: Jay's solution leaves us with just a CLR property in the MainWindow class:

namespace MyProject
{
  public partial class MainWindow: Window
  {
    public UserControlConfig MyUserControlConfig {get; private set;}
    ...
  }
}

Now if it was just possible to remove the dependency property from the MyUserControl class and replace it with a simple property that still gets initialized via XAML binding (or some other XAML mechanism, so I can pass in the data source via XAML).

share|improve this question
    
The MyUserControlConfig Property in the UserControl doesn't need to be a Dependency Property, a normal CLR property will do fine. A Dependency Property is only required when you want to bind the Property to something else, so Config must be a DP –  Fredrik Hedblad Dec 29 '10 at 16:36
    
@Meleak I think that is backward? ConfigProperty should be a DP and MyUserControlConfigProperty need not be, since the former will bind to the latter. –  Jay Dec 29 '10 at 16:39
    
@Jay: Indeed it was :) I looked at the question again and updated my comment –  Fredrik Hedblad Dec 29 '10 at 16:41
    
Jay's answer leaves us with one dependency property (in MyUserControl) and one CLR property in MainWindow. Is there anything simpler than this? –  Michael Goldshteyn Dec 29 '10 at 16:59
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I could be mistaken, but if you can bind to CLR properties on other classes, I'd expect you could bind to a CLR proprety on your MainWindow class.

Have you tried that?

share|improve this answer
    
I have tried using a public automatically defined propert in Main Window: UserControlConfig MyUserControlConfig {get; set;} which was initialized in MainWindow's constructor. But, although the code compiled without error, the Config property in MyUserControl did not get set to a value (i.e., it stayed null). Only when I made UserControlConfig a dependency property in MainWindow, did the passing of its value via the Binding work. Maybe I am doing something wrong? –  Michael Goldshteyn Dec 29 '10 at 16:54
    
I just tried again to make the MainWindow property a regular automatically generated property initialized in the MainWindow constructor and it does in fact work. I must have messed something up the last time I tried. Thank you very much for your help! –  Michael Goldshteyn Dec 29 '10 at 16:58
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