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The following code gives err - "No implicit conversion from DBnull to int."

SqlParameter[] parameters = new SqlParameter[1];    
SqlParameter planIndexParameter = new SqlParameter("@AgeIndex", SqlDbType.Int);
planIndexParameter.Value = (AgeItem.AgeIndex== null) ? DBNull.Value : AgeItem.AgeIndex== ;
parameters[0] = planIndexParameter;
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4  
You need to cast AgeItem.AgeIndex to object I think... stackoverflow.com/questions/202271/… (btw, why the == at the end of the 3rd line?) –  Greg Dec 29 '10 at 16:48

11 Answers 11

up vote 85 down vote accepted

The problem is that the ?: operator cannot determine the return type because you are either returning an int value or a DBNull type value, which are not compatible.

You can of course cast the instance of AgeIndex to be type object which would satisfy the ?: requirement.

You can use the ?? null-coalascing operator as follows

SqlParameter[] parameters = new SqlParameter[1];     
SqlParameter planIndexParameter = new SqlParameter("@AgeIndex", SqlDbType.Int);
planIndexParameter.Value = (object)AgeItem.AgeIndex ?? DBNull.Value;
parameters[0] = planIndexParameter; 

Here is a quote from the MSDN documentation for the ?: operator that explains the problem

*"Either the type of first_expression and second_expression must be the same, or an implicit conversion must exist from one type to the other."*

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+1 Seems like the best solution to me and it addresses and explains the problem with ?: –  Greg Dec 29 '10 at 16:59
    
+1 thanks for digging up the actual explanation why this fails! –  marc_s Dec 29 '10 at 17:11
    
Why is there no exception thrown when trying to cast null to object? I would think it should be AgeItem.AgeIndex as object –  Niels Brinch Jun 5 '12 at 8:34
    
@Niels Brinch, there would not be an exception because null is an object and as long as you do not try dereference it, it is perfectly legal. However, in this example it is not null being cast to object, it is DBNull.Value which is actually a value type. The ?? operator says 'if AgetItem.AgeIndex is null then return DBNull.Value otherwise returen AgeItem.AgeIndex' then the response is cast to object. See null coalescing operator for more details. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173224.aspx –  Chris Taylor Jun 9 '12 at 11:23
2  
Technically, your solution using the null-coalescing operator ?? is the same solution as if you were to use the regular ternary ?: - you still need to cast AgeItem.AgeIndex to an object: planIndexParameter.Value = AgeItem.AgeIndex.HasValue ? (object)AgeItem.AgeIndex : DBNull.Value;. –  newfurniturey Aug 15 '13 at 7:55

You need pass DBNull.Value as a null parameter within SQLCommand, unless a default value is specified within stored procedure (if you are using stored procedure). The best approach is to assign DBNull.Value for any missing parameter before query execution, and following foreach will do the job.

foreach (SqlParameter parameter in sqlCmd.Parameters)
{
    if (parameter.Value == null)
    {
        parameter.Value = DBNull.Value;
    }
}

Otherwise change this line:

planIndexParameter.Value = (AgeItem.AgeIndex== null) ? DBNull.Value : AgeItem.AgeIndex;

As follows:

if (AgeItem.AgeIndex== null)
    planIndexParameter.Value = DBNull.Value;
else
    planIndexParameter.Value = AgeItem.AgeIndex;

Because you can't use different type of values in conditional statement, as DBNull and int are different from each other. Hope this will help.

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The accepted answer suggests making use of a cast. However, most of the SQL types have a special Null field which can be used to avoid this cast.

For example, SqlInt32.Null "Represents a DBNull that can be assigned to this instance of the SqlInt32 class."

int? example = null;
object exampleCast = (object) example ?? DBNull.Value;
object exampleNoCast = example ?? SqlInt32.Null;
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Try this:

SqlParameter[] parameters = new SqlParameter[1];    
SqlParameter planIndexParameter = new SqlParameter("@AgeIndex", SqlDbType.Int);

planIndexParameter.IsNullable = true; // Add this line

planIndexParameter.Value = (AgeItem.AgeIndex== null) ? DBNull.Value : AgeItem.AgeIndex== ;
parameters[0] = planIndexParameter;
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In my opinion the better way is to do this with the Parameters property of the SqlCommand class:

public static void AddCommandParameter(SqlCommand myCommand)
{
    myCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue(
        "@AgeIndex",
        (AgeItem.AgeIndex== null) ? DBNull.Value : AgeItem.AgeIndex);
}
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But if the value is DBNull.Value, ADO.NET might have somewhat of a hard time guessing what SqlDbType that might be........ this is convenient - but a bit dangerous.... –  marc_s Dec 29 '10 at 16:49

Try this:

if (AgeItem.AgeIndex != null)
{
   SqlParameter[] parameters = new SqlParameter[1];
   SqlParameter planIndexParameter = new SqlParameter("@AgeIndex", SqlDbType.Int);
   planIndexParameter.Value = AgeItem.AgeIndex;
   parameters[0] = planIndexParameter;
}

In other words, if the parameter is null just don't send it to your stored proc (assuming, of course, that the stored proc accepts null parameters which is implicit in your question).

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i didnt understand what you mean. –  Relativity Dec 29 '10 at 16:46
    
But now, you're just omitting a parameter - I highly doubt the stored procedure will be happy about this.... most likely, the call will fail stating "no value for parameter @AgeIndex supplied which was expected"..... –  marc_s Dec 29 '10 at 16:48
    
Wow. Harsh. Just write the stored proc to default to a value if the parameter is not passed (@AgeIndex int = 0). Happens all the time. The client can either accept the default, or override it by passing the parameter. Why the downvote? –  FlipScript Jan 5 '11 at 6:24
    
I was able to remove the downvote since the question was edited. –  Greg Jan 11 '11 at 13:27

try something like this:

if (_id_categoria_padre > 0)
{
    objComando.Parameters.Add("id_categoria_padre", SqlDbType.Int).Value = _id_categoria_padre;
}
else
{
    objComando.Parameters.Add("id_categoria_padre", DBNull.Value).Value = DBNull.Value;
}
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int? nullableValue = null;
object nullableValueDB
{
   get{
       if(nullableValue==null)
          return DBNull.Value;
       else
          return (int)nullableValue;
   }
}

I'm solving like that.

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Consider using the Nullable(T) structure available. It'll let you only set values if you have them, and your SQL Command objects will recognize the nullable value and process accordingly with no hassle on your end.

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if (_id_categoria_padre > 0)
{
    objComando.Parameters.Add("id_categoria_padre", SqlDbType.Int).Value = _id_categoria_padre;
}
else
{
    objComando.Parameters.Add("id_categoria_padre", DBNull.Value).Value = DBNull.Value;
}
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if (AgeItem.AgeIndex== null)  
    cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("ParaMeterName", SqlDbType.DateTime).Value = DBNull);  
else  
    cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("ParaMeterName", SqlDbType.DateTime).Value = AgeItem.AgeIndex);
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