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My end goal is being able to do something like this:

MyVar(parameter).functionToPerform();

Silly enough, even after reading up on how variables are declared, looking at the jQuery code, ... I still can't get my head around it.

This is what I've tried so far, but it fails:

var MyClass = function(context) {
this.print = function(){
    console.log("Printing");
}

this.move = function(){
    console.log(context);
}
};

var test = new MyClass();
test.print(); // Works
console.log('Moving: ' + test('azerty').move() ); // Type property error
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2  
test(...) is not the same as new test(...). :) –  bzlm Dec 29 '10 at 17:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

jQuery() is both a module with global methods, and a constructor. It automatically calls a constructor if it needs to. If we are not called with a new keyword, then this will not have been constructed with MyClass. We can detect that and call the function in constructor mode instead. Once we do that, then this will be an instance of MyClass and we can start adding stuff to it.

var MyClass = function(context) {
    // if the function is called without being called as a constructor,
    // then call as a constructor for us.
    if (this.__proto__.constructor !== MyClass) {
        return new MyClass(context);
    }

    // Save the context
    this.context = context;

    // methods...
    this.print = function() {
        return "Printing";
    }

    this.move = function() {
        return this.context;
    }
};

$('#output').append('<li>print(): '+ MyClass().print() +'</li>');
$('#output').append('<li>move():'+ MyClass('azerty').move() +'</li>');
$('#output').append('<li>context: '+ MyClass('azerty').context +'</li>');

http://jsfiddle.net/rvvBr/1/

share|improve this answer
    
Now I get it. It still needs to be instantiated, but that can be done from the inside. Pretty cool, thanks! –  skerit Dec 29 '10 at 17:39
1  
Happy to help! Also, I just updated my answer with a better way to detect if it being called as a constructor or not by actually checking the constructor of the prototype of this. Should be much more robust. –  Alex Wayne Dec 29 '10 at 17:43
    
Even though it works how I want it to I just realized that (because it's being instantiated for every MyClass() call) it's quite slow for my purpose. You live and learn :P –  skerit Dec 30 '10 at 2:08

As I write this, Squeegy's answer has the highest number of votes: 7. Yet it is wrong because __proto__ is non-standard and is not supported by Internet Explorer (even version 8). However, getting rid of __proto__ does not get it working either in IE 6.

This (somewhat simplified) is the way jQuery actually does it (even try it on IE 6), and it also includes examples of static methods and method chaining. For all the details of how jQuery does it, of course you will have to check the jQuery source code yourself.

var MyClass = function(context) {
    // Call the constructor
    return new MyClass.init(context);
};

// Static methods
MyClass.init = function(context) {
    // Save the context
    this.context = context;
};
MyClass.messageBox = function(str) {
    alert(str);
};


// Instance methods
MyClass.init.prototype.print = function() {
    return "Printing";
};
MyClass.init.prototype.move = function() {
    return this.context;
};

// Method chaining example
MyClass.init.prototype.flash = function() {
    document.body.style.backgroundColor = '#ffc';
    setInterval(function() {
        document.body.style.backgroundColor = '';
    }, 5000);
    return this;
};


$('#output').append('<li>print(): '+ MyClass().print() +'</li>');
$('#output').append('<li>flash().move():'+ MyClass('azerty').flash().move() +'</li>');
$('#output').append('<li>context: '+ MyClass('azerty').context +'</li>');
MyClass.messageBox('Hello, world!');

Note that if you need "private" data, you will have to put instance methods inside MyClass.init (with a variable declared just inside that function) as this.print = function() { ... }; instead of using MyClass.init.prototype.

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when you do

var test = new MyClass()

you create an object that has two attributes move and print. You object test is no more a function because of the new statement. So calling test() is wrong.

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1  
calling test().move() is wrong if you are trying to instantiate a test object, however chaining function calls (key to jQuery's implementation) is very possible. –  zzzzBov Dec 29 '10 at 17:25

every time you call $ in jQuery it returns a new jQuery.init object. The jQuery.init object has functions that are then called.

function test(type)
{
  switch (type)
  {
    case 'azerty':
      return new type.a();
    case 'qwerty':
    default:
      return new type.b();
  }
}

test.a = function()
{
  //a object defined
};

test.a.prototype.move = function()
{
  //move function defined for the a object
};

etc...

I just typed this on the fly, so it may need some tweaking

This would allow you to call test('azerty').move();. More importantly: I hope you can see the general structure being used.

Edit to add:

To continue chaining functions like in jQuery, make sure you return the this object at the end of each function call:

test.a.prototype.move = function()
{
  //move function defined for the a object
  return this;
};
share|improve this answer

You can pass the 'azerty' value as parameter to MyClass constructor and change the test('azerty').move() to test.move()

<script type="text/javascript">
    var MyClass = function(context) { 
        this.print = function(){     
            console.log("Printing"); 
        }  
        this.move = function(){     
        console.log(context); 
        return context;
        } 
    };  
    var test = new MyClass('azerty'); 
    test.print(); // Works 
    console.log('Moving: ' + test.move() ); // Type property error 
</script>
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