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I am trying to use XSL to transform the following WCF call and place the result in a queue:

<s:Envelope xmlns:a="http://www.w3.org/2005/08/addressing" xmlns:s="http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap-envelope">
  <s:Header>
    <a:Action s:mustUnderstand="1">SendMessage</a:Action>
    <a:MessageID>urn:uuid:19034ce7-c5ce-4670-ac6c-cfef30c245bd</a:MessageID>
    <a:ReplyTo>
      <a:Address>http://www.w3.org/2005/08/addressing/anonymous</a:Address>
    </a:ReplyTo>
  </s:Header>
  <s:Body>
    <SendMessage xmlns="http://my.custom.namespace/2007/12">
      <request xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
        <to>Test</to>
        <from>Test</from>
        <message>Test</message>
        <service>Test</service>
      </request>
    </SendMessage>
  </s:Body>
</s:Envelope>

What I would like to do is get to the 'to', 'from', 'message', and 'service' nodes, but I am having trouble selecting beyond due to the default namespaces used in the child nodes. Does anyone know the proper xPath query I should be using to get to these nodes?

Thanks,

Mike

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Good question, +1. See my answer for a complete solution. –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 29 '10 at 20:33
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What I would like to do is get to the 'to', 'from', 'message', and 'service' nodes, but I am having trouble selecting beyond due to the default namespaces used in the child nodes. Does anyone know the proper xPath query I should be using to get to these nodes?

Use:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:s="http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap-envelope"
 xmlns:sb="http://my.custom.namespace/2007/12">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:copy-of select=
  "/*/s:Body/sb:SendMessage/sb:request/*"/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when this transformation is applied on the provided XML document:

<s:Envelope xmlns:a="http://www.w3.org/2005/08/addressing" xmlns:s="http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap-envelope">
    <s:Header>
        <a:Action s:mustUnderstand="1">SendMessage</a:Action>
        <a:MessageID>urn:uuid:19034ce7-c5ce-4670-ac6c-cfef30c245bd</a:MessageID>
        <a:ReplyTo>
            <a:Address>http://www.w3.org/2005/08/addressing/anonymous</a:Address>
        </a:ReplyTo>
    </s:Header>
    <s:Body>
        <SendMessage xmlns="http://my.custom.namespace/2007/12">
            <request xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
                <to>Test</to>
                <from>Test</from>
                <message>Test</message>
                <service>Test</service>
            </request>
        </SendMessage>
    </s:Body>
</s:Envelope>

the wanted nodes are output:

<to xmlns="http://my.custom.namespace/2007/12" xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:a="http://www.w3.org/2005/08/addressing" xmlns:s="http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap-envelope">Test</to>
<from xmlns="http://my.custom.namespace/2007/12" xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:a="http://www.w3.org/2005/08/addressing" xmlns:s="http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap-envelope">Test</from>
<message xmlns="http://my.custom.namespace/2007/12" xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:a="http://www.w3.org/2005/08/addressing" xmlns:s="http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap-envelope">Test</message>
<service xmlns="http://my.custom.namespace/2007/12" xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:a="http://www.w3.org/2005/08/addressing" xmlns:s="http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap-envelope">Test</service>
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Perfect, that did the trick nicely. Thanks! –  Mike C Dec 29 '10 at 20:56
    
+1 For a correct answer. Plus, I like the "what ever root element" step :) –  user357812 Dec 29 '10 at 22:03
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