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I thought that template specializations were fully independent entities and could have whatever they wanted. But VC++ threw me an error when I made the return type of a specialization different to the return type of the original template. Is that really Standard? I worked around it easily by moving the function body into a static class.

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If it's something entirely different, don't make it an overload (aka template specialization) ;) –  delnan Dec 29 '10 at 20:42
    
@delnan: The only difference is that one of them returns a reference, the other a value, as an implementation detail. –  Puppy Dec 29 '10 at 20:44
1  
Is this question genuinely C++0x specific? –  Charles Bailey Dec 29 '10 at 20:46
    
I would consider that a significant semantic difference, not an implementation detail (implementation details don't leak, in a perfect world). –  delnan Dec 29 '10 at 20:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Function specialization is weird and almost non-existent. It's possible to fully specialize a function, while retaining all types - i.e. you're providing a custom implementation of some specialization of the existing function. You can not partially specialize a templated function.

It's likely that what you're trying to do can be achieved with overloading, i.e.:

template <typename T> T foo(T arg) { return T(); }
float foo(int arg) { return 1.f; }
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Except I don't take any arguments. I fully specialized my function, I was just surprised that my full spec couldn't have a separate return type. –  Puppy Dec 29 '10 at 21:28
    
Full specialization is not permitted to change any of the types for functions. And, if you don't have arguments, overloading will not save you either. Note that a static member function of a templated class is completely different (which is why it works) - you're specializing the class instead of the function. –  zeuxcg Dec 29 '10 at 21:33

There is no function template partial specialization, because there's overloading of functions (and function templates. However, function overloading is much more limited than template specialization, so what you usually do, is to fall back on class template specializations:

template< typename R, typename T >
struct foo_impl {
  static R foo(T)
  {
    // ...
    return R();   // blah
  }
};

template< typename T >
struct foo_impl<void,T> {
  static void foo(T)
  {
    // ...
  }
};

template< typename R, typename T >
R foo(T obj);
{
  return foo_impl<R,T>::foo(obj);  // fine even if R is void
}
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