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Given that in .NET the System.String class is sealed, how do you create a simple domain-specific string class so you can use type checking to ensure that the correct sort of string is used? Do you have a favourite implementation of such a class?

You might, for example, want to create a class to represent an email address to ensure that email is not accidentally sent to someone's postal address. Although that's not a great example I'm thinking about the cases where all you need is the type safety but no additional logic or validation.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can wrap the string class in one of your own and add all the type checking you want.

Think composition, instead of inheritance.

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+1 Prefer composition over inheritance. –  Randy Levy Dec 29 '10 at 21:00
    
That's what I've been doing up to now (it's a good way to cut down the interface to what is appropriate, too), I'm asking because I'm throwing away all of the careful optimization that the String class has had, or in case I missed something. –  GraemeF Dec 29 '10 at 21:21
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Doesn't seem like you're losing anything, especially if any operations are just going to go against the member String. –  s_hewitt Dec 29 '10 at 21:28

You might be interested in http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.net.mail.mailaddress.aspx in terms of your e-mail address example.

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Not really what I'm looking for, my types are far more esoteric than that ;) –  GraemeF Dec 29 '10 at 21:18
    
gotcha - well, if you're interested, you could always use Reflector on that class to get an idea of what's going on. –  Chad Dec 29 '10 at 21:21

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