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Lastly I wrote a simple generator of permutations in python (implementation of "plain changes" algorithm described by Knuth in "The Art... 4"). I was curious about the differences in execution time of it between python2 and python3. Here is my function:

def perms(s):
    s = tuple(s)
    N = len(s)
    if N <= 1:
        yield s[:]
        raise StopIteration()
    for x in perms(s[1:]):
        for i in range(0,N):
        yield x[:i] + (s[0],) + x[i:]

In the python3 version I just changed print x to print(x) as print is a function in py3. I tested both using timeit module.

My tests:

$ echo "python2.6:" && ./testing.py && echo "python3:" && ./testing3.py

python2.6:

args time[ms]
1 0.003811
2 0.008268
3 0.015907
4 0.042646
5 0.166755
6 0.908796
7 6.117996
8 48.346996
9 433.928967
10 4379.904032

python3:

args time[ms]
1   0.00246778964996
2   0.00656183719635
3   0.01419159912
4   0.0406293644678
5   0.165960511097
6   0.923101452814
7   6.24257639835
8   53.0099868774
9   454.540967941
10  4585.83498001

As you can see, for number of arguments less than 6, python 3 is faster, but then roles are reversed and python2.6 does better. As I am a novice in python programming, I wonder why is that so? Or maybe my script is more optimized for python2?

Thank you in advance for kind answer :)

share|improve this question
    
Please use proper formatting. –  Mark Byers Dec 29 '10 at 21:52
    
First, format your code using the {} button. Then explain why this matters. –  S.Lott Dec 29 '10 at 21:52
2  
` I would just like to know what difference between python2 and python3 causes this`. Python3 is pretty vastly different from python 2. They're not even backwards compatible. What exactly are you looking for that would answer your question. Would you like to be pointed to the C code for each version? –  Falmarri Dec 29 '10 at 21:59
1  
"fairly the same script, just ported to python3" Did you make changes to port the script? If so, precisely what changes did you make? Please update the question with the exact changes you made. –  S.Lott Dec 29 '10 at 22:38
2  
@marcog: "Assuming"... Always a mistake. And "trivial" changes could explain the trivial timing differences. –  S.Lott Dec 30 '10 at 0:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is actually a very interesting question.

I used the following script which runs on Python 2.6, 2.7, 3.0, 3.1, and 3.2.

from __future__ import print_function
from timeit import Timer
from math import factorial

try:
    range = xrange
except:
    pass

def perms(s):
    s = tuple(s)
    N = len(s)
    if N <= 1:
        yield s[:]
        raise StopIteration()
    for x in perms(s[1:]):
        for i in range(0,N):
            yield x[:i] + (s[0],) + x[i:]

def testcase(s):
    for x in perms(s):
        pass

def test():
    for i in range(1,11):
        s = "".join(["%d" % x for x in range(i)])
        s = "testcase(\"%s\")" % s
        t = Timer(s,"from __main__ import testcase")
        factor = 100000
        factor = int(factor/factorial(i))
        factor = (factor>0) and factor or 1
        yield (i,(1000*min(t.repeat(5,factor))/factor))

if __name__=="__main__":
    print("args\ttime[ms]")
    for x in test():
        print("%i\t%f" % x)

The platform is Ubuntu 10.10, 64 bit, and all versions of Python were compiled from source. I get the following results:

case@quad:~$ py27 perms.py
args    time[ms]
1   0.002221
2   0.005072
3   0.010352
4   0.027648
5   0.111339
6   0.618658
7   4.207046
8   33.213019
9   294.044971
10  2976.780891

case@quad:~$ py32 perms.py
args    time[ms]
1   0.001725
2   0.004997
3   0.011208
4   0.032815
5   0.139474
6   0.761153
7   5.068729
8   39.760470
9   356.358051
10  3566.874027

After some more experimentation, I tracked the difference in performance to the fragment: x[:i] + (s[0],) + x[i:] If I just calculate one tuple at the beginning of the loop and return it for every yield statement, both versions of Python run at the same speed. (And the permutations are wrong, but that's not the point.)

If I time that fragment by itself, it is significantly slower.

case@quad:~$ py27 -m timeit -s "s=(1,2,3,4,5);x=(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8)" "x[:3] + (s[0],) + x[3:]"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.549 usec per loop
case@quad:~$ py32 -m timeit -s "s=(1,2,3,4,5);x=(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8)" "x[:3] + (s[0],) + x[3:]"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.687 usec per loop

I next used dis.dis() to look at the bytecode generated by both versions.

case@quad:~/src/Python-3.0.1$ py32
Python 3.2b2 (r32b2:87398, Dec 21 2010, 21:39:59) 
[GCC 4.4.5] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import dis
>>> s=(1,2,3,4,5)
>>> x=(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8)
>>> def f(s,x):
...   return x[:3] + (s[0],) + x[3:]
... 
>>> dis.dis(f)
  2           0 LOAD_FAST                1 (x) 
              3 LOAD_CONST               0 (None) 
              6 LOAD_CONST               1 (3) 
              9 BUILD_SLICE              2 
             12 BINARY_SUBSCR        
             13 LOAD_FAST                0 (s) 
             16 LOAD_CONST               2 (0) 
             19 BINARY_SUBSCR        
             20 BUILD_TUPLE              1 
             23 BINARY_ADD           
             24 LOAD_FAST                1 (x) 
             27 LOAD_CONST               1 (3) 
             30 LOAD_CONST               0 (None) 
             33 BUILD_SLICE              2 
             36 BINARY_SUBSCR        
             37 BINARY_ADD           
             38 RETURN_VALUE         
>>> exit()
case@quad:~/src/Python-3.0.1$ py26
Python 2.6.6 (r266:84292, Oct 24 2010, 15:27:46) 
[GCC 4.4.5] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import dis
>>> s=(1,2,3,4,5)
>>> x=(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8)
>>> def f(s,x):
...   return x[:3] + (s[0],) + x[3:]
... 
>>> dis.dis(f)
  2           0 LOAD_FAST                1 (x)
              3 LOAD_CONST               1 (3)
              6 SLICE+2             
              7 LOAD_FAST                0 (s)
             10 LOAD_CONST               2 (0)
             13 BINARY_SUBSCR       
             14 BUILD_TUPLE              1
             17 BINARY_ADD          
             18 LOAD_FAST                1 (x)
             21 LOAD_CONST               1 (3)
             24 SLICE+1             
             25 BINARY_ADD          
             26 RETURN_VALUE        
>>> 

The generated bytecode is very different between the two versions. Unfortunately, I don't know why the bytecode is different so I really haven't answered the question. But there really is a significant difference in performance for slicing and building tuples.

share|improve this answer
    
Why are you saying those permutations are wrong? I don't see what could be wrong in them. –  Piotr Hajduga Jan 1 '11 at 1:05
    
@kosa: To remove the running time for the creation of the tuple, I created one tuple of the correct length and returned the same tuple for all iterations of the range(0,N). The actual permutations returned for that particular test were not correct, but the running time was identical for Python 2 and 3. Close to two-thirds of the running time of perms() is the fragment: x[:i] + (s[0],) + x[i:]. Since that fragment is 25% slower on Python 3, and it accounts for 65% of the running time, the total running time should be about 17% slower, which roughly matches the tests. –  casevh Jan 1 '11 at 7:01
    
Ah, now I see. Well, this is the answer I hoped for. Thank you! –  Piotr Hajduga Jan 1 '11 at 13:08

Quoting:

The net result of the 3.0 generalizations is that Python 3.0 runs the pystone benchmark around 10% slower than Python 2.5. Most likely the biggest cause is the removal of special-casing for small integers. There’s room for improvement, but it will happen after 3.0 is released!

>>> 4585.83498001/4379.904032
1.0470172283468882

So you're seeing about a 5% slowdown. The quoted text says to expect a 10% slowdown. So I'd be accept that as a reasonable slowdown.

However, is has been improving as can be seen here and here. So give 3.1 or 3.2 a try if you're concerned about the 5% slowdown.

share|improve this answer
    
@ΤΖΩΤΖΙΟΥ I didn't say that. It is a quote from the 3.0 release notes. And the improvements did happen after the 3.0 release: in 3.1 and 3.2 as mentioned in my last paragraph. –  marcog Jan 27 '11 at 20:58
    
you're right; I saw your reply on a laptop with a very low contrast LCD screen (read: old), so the quote background wasn't as visible as it should be. –  tzot Jan 29 '11 at 22:46

I would certainly call those numbers statistically insignificant.

There are too many factors at work for those variations to really hold any meaning.

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