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What my designer wants and what I'm trying to code is a footer that begins at the bottom of dynamic content (actually, they want the footer to start beneath the content area up about 20px - but that's something else). The thing is, they have a gradient that they want down there that expands as the browser window does.

Due to the gradient I can't just cheat and declare the window color as black and if I set the size of the footer to the height of the gradient, I end up with the scroll bar. I feel I must be missing something incredibly obvious, but I've been staring at it so long I just am seeing cross-eyed.

<body>
    <div id = "page">
        <div id = "header">
        </div>
        <div id = "content">
            I am ze content area (for now)
        </div>
    </div>
    <div id = "footer">
        I AM THA FOOTAH<br/> So much cooler than the header these days
    </div>
</body>

body
{
    background-color: grey;
    font-family:"Trebuchet MS", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
    margin: 0px;
    padding: 0px;
}

div
{
    display: block;
}

#page
{
    background-color: white;
    margin: 0px auto;
    padding: 0px;
}

#header
{
    background: url("http://kjunek.com/images/header_background.png") repeat-x;
    color: yellow;
    height: 240px;
}

#content
{
    background-color: white;
}

#footer
{
    background: #030a19 url("http://kjunek.com/images/footer_background.png") repeat-x 50% 0%;
    height: 626px;
    overflow: hidden;
    color: white;
}

Kind of like http://roughtech.com/t/oppsticky.html from Doing the opposite of CSS Sticky Footer only I want the red to continue down to the bottom of a window with a gradient that fades to black.

Thanks!

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kjunek.com/images/footer_background.png is not a gradient. I am not sure if I understand; is the height of the footer 626px and it fades to black and everything below it needs to be black or are you tring to do a css3 calc today w3.org/TR/css3-values/#calc? As it stands now - switch the graphic to the grad and since all blocks have a background switch body background from grey to black. The height of the page is 866px = (249px + 626px) plus the space used by content. That would give you a scroll bar on systems with less than 1600x1200 resolution. –  Wayne Dec 30 '10 at 1:24
    
a) Not sure what you mean by "kjunek.com/images/footer_background.png is not a gradient" it's a png that is a gradient that goes from navy to almost black. –  kjunek Dec 30 '10 at 16:22
    
b) To clarify, I don't want all 626 pixels of the gradient showing at all times. If the viewport is only 800 pixels high, I'd only want 560 of the gradient for the footer showing. If it header (240) + content (x) + footer content (y) > viewport height then the footer would only be as big as the content in the footer. If header (240) + content (x) + footer content (y) < viewport then the footer would be viewport height - header height - content height, 626px of which would be the gradient. Calc won't work as we have to support the last two major revisions of browsers (eg: IE8, IE7) –  kjunek Dec 30 '10 at 16:32

1 Answer 1

Deleted my last answer - it does not work either. In standards compliant modes the only content that can not be scrolled to is content inside a parent which is hidden. And except for bugs it is not shown. What I was looking at was a IE bug.

Sorry no can do in CSS as it stands today.

If you need to do a calc today you would need to use jquery to get the heights of the elements then calculate the height needed for the footer; And, use CSS gradients http://robertnyman.com/2010/02/15/css-gradients-for-all-web-browsers-without-using-images/ so you can go from your shade of navy to your shade of black. I would discourage this approach as when you start to consider all of the possible resolution situations the calculation it will become rather complex and I assume they may want to redesign the heights depending on different resolutions.

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