Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to define a function in C language which can take an unlimited number of arguments of any datatype. For example: printf(), scanf(), etc.

Any idea on this?

share|improve this question
7  
*Note: Probably best avoided where possible... –  Billy ONeal Dec 30 '10 at 3:27
    
@Billy: Totally agree. :) –  Mehrdad Dec 30 '10 at 3:29
    
you cannot write a function which can take an "unlimited" number of arguments. There is always some upper limit. What you probably meant is, "variable" number of arguments. –  Nawaz Dec 30 '10 at 8:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To use variable number of arguments in C you need to include the header

#include <stdarg.h>

printf() in C is an example of function that takes variable number of arguments.

int printf(const char *fmt, ...)

More info here

share|improve this answer

Declare the function as taking a ... last argument. You'll need to use the macros from <stdarg.h> to access the arguments as a va_list.

If you just want something "like printf, but with a little extra behavior", then you can pass the va_list to vprintf, vfprintf, or vsprintf.

#include <stdarg.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

#ifdef __GNUC__
    __attribute__((format(printf, 1, 2)))
#endif
void PrintErrorMsg(const char* fmt, ...)
{
    time_t     now; 
    char       buffer[20];
    va_list    args;

    va_start(args, fmt);
    time(&now);
    strftime(buffer, sizeof(buffer), "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S", gmtime(&now));
    fprintf(stderr, "[%s] ", buffer);
    vfprintf(stderr, fmt, args);
    fputc('\n', stderr);
    va_end(args);
}
share|improve this answer
void printf(char* format, ...)
{
}

Look up Variadic Functions and varargs.h or stdarg.h (depending on the compiler).

share|improve this answer
4  
There shouldn't be any compiler still in use that still requires <varargs.h>; all modern compilers (meaning less than about 10 years old) support <stdarg.h> and new code should only use that. Note that some compilers no longer support <varargs.h>; I think I encountered this on HP-UX (by accident). –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 30 '10 at 3:30

See the <stdarg.h> header and related documentation.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.