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Newbie question. Is there a fast way to tab backward without pressing backspace however number of time I set my tab space?

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I'm not sure what you mean by 'tab backwards'. Do you mean in edit mode to delete spaces that you've just inserted with tab or in exec mode to move back by more than one character at the time (backspace moves back by one char at the time ...) ? –  stefanB Dec 30 '10 at 4:08
    
The fastest way is to actually use tab characters for indentation. Then you have (with autoindent) one single keypress for all your indentation level shifts. In edit mode: One more level, press tab. Going back one level, press backspace. In command mode: arrow keys or h/l. –  hlovdal Jul 24 '11 at 6:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 23 down vote accepted

If you're in insert mode:

  • C-d - shift left
  • C-t - shift right

If you're in normal mode:

  • << - shift current line left
  • >> - shift current line right

If you're in visual mode and have 1 or more lines selected:

  • < - shift selection left
  • > - shift selection right

If you mean just to move backwards a word in normal mode, you can use b to go backwards a word.

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didn't know that about insert mode –  Matt Briggs Dec 30 '10 at 7:04
    
Wow, thanks. I knew about the << and >>, but those shifts whole line –  Hien Dec 30 '10 at 7:05
2  
In case you didn't already know: C-d is entered as Ctrl+d. –  Serrano Pereira Aug 9 '13 at 18:10
set softtabstop=4 expandtab

and you will be able to add up to four spaces when you press tab and remove up to four spaces by pressing <BS> once.

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in normal mode, << will tab the current line back one, in visual mode, < will make all selected lines tab back once

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