Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

when reading "Beyond the C++ Standard Library: An Introduction to Boost " ,I got a very interesting example:

class A  
{  
public:  
    virtual void sing()=0;  
protected:  
    virtual ~A() {};  
};

class B : public A
{  
public:  
    virtual void sing(  )  
    {  
       std::cout << "Do re mi fa so la"<<std::endl;;  
    }  
};  

and I do some testing:

int main()
{  

//1  
std::auto_ptr<A> a(new B); //will not compile ,error: ‘virtual A::~A()’ is protected

//2
A *pa = new B;
delete pa;  //will not compile ,error: ‘virtual A::~A()’ is protected
delete (dynamic_cast<B*>(pa)); //ok

//3 
boost::shared_ptr<A> a(new B);//ok

}

what I am very curious here is how ~shared_ptr works? how it deduce the derived class B ?

Thanks advance for your help!

thanks all, I write a simple sample about how ~shared_ptr works

class sp_counted_base
{
public:
    virtual ~sp_counted_base(){}
};

template<typename T>
class sp_counted_base_impl : public sp_counted_base
{
public:
    sp_counted_base_impl(T *t):t_(t){}
    ~sp_counted_base_impl(){delete t_;}
private:
    T *t_;
};


class shared_count
{
public:
    static int count_;
    template<typename T>
    shared_count(T *t):
        t_(new sp_counted_base_impl<T>(t))
    {
        count_ ++;
    }
    void release()
    {
        --count_;
        if(0 == count_) delete t_;
    }
    ~shared_count()
    {
        release();
    }
private:
    sp_counted_base *t_;
};
int shared_count::count_(0);

template<typename T>
class myautoptr
{
public:
    template<typename Y>
    myautoptr(Y* y):sc_(y),t_(y){}
    ~myautoptr(){ sc_.release();}
private:
    shared_count sc_;
    T *t_;
};

int main()
{
    myautoptr<A> a(new B);
}

the key is:

  1. template construct function
  2. the resource not deleted in ~shared_ptr ,it is deleted by shared_count
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Surprisingly, the key here is not boost::shared_ptr destructor but its constructor(s).

If you look into boost/shared_ptr.hpp, you will see that shared_ptr<T> does not 'simply' have a constructor expecting a T * but :

template<class Y>
explicit shared_ptr( Y * p );

In //3 when you construct a boost::shared_ptr from a B *, no conversion to A * takes place, and the shared_ptr internals are built with the actual B type. Upon destruction of the object, deletion occurs on a B pointer (not through a base class pointer).

share|improve this answer
1  
Technically speaking, it DOES perform a conversion from B* to A*. All subsequent accesses to the pointer will use the type A*. Operations on type B are via standard polymorphism (they go through A*). The only exception is the destructor, which shared_ptr remembers via its "deleter" mechanism (or some generalization thereof). –  nobar Feb 20 '11 at 4:56

The shared_ptr class template has a member of class type shared_count, which in turn has a member of type pointer to class sp_counted_base. The constructor template for class shared_count assigns a pointer to an instance of the class template sp_counted_impl_p to this member which is templated by the type of the constructor argument, not by the shared_ptr::value_type. sp_counted_base has a pure virtual member function dispose which is overwritten by sp_counted_impl_p. Because sp_counted_impl_p knows the type B in your example, it can delete it without access to the base class destructor, and because it uses virtual dispatch, the type is determined at runtime. This method requires a combination of parametric and subtype polymorphism.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.