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MySQL supports "for update" keyword. Here is how I tested that it is working as expected. I opened 2 browser tabs and executed the following commands in one window.

mysql> start transaction;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from myxml where id = 2 for update;
....
mysql> update myxml set id = 3 where id = 2 limit 1;
Query OK, 1 row affected, 1 warning (0.00 sec)
Rows matched: 1  Changed: 1  Warnings: 0

mysql> commit;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.08 sec)

In another window, I started the transaction and tried to take an update lock on the same record.

mysql> start transaction;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from myxml where id = 2 for update;
Empty set (43.81 sec)

As you can see from the above example, I could not select the record for 43 seconds as the transaction was being processed by another application in the Window No 1. Once the transaction was over, I got to select the record, but since the id 2 was changed to id 3 by the transaction that was executed first, no record was returned.

My question is what are the disadvantages of using "for update" syntax? If I do not commit the transaction that is running in window 1 will the record be locked for-ever?

share|improve this question
    
"disadvantages" that is very dependent on your requirements, can you please explain more what you need the locks for? –  The Scrum Meister Dec 30 '10 at 7:00
    
I have accepted answers to almost all the questions. You can check it if you want. Please stop asking people to work on something that is not possible :) –  shantanuo Dec 30 '10 at 7:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, if transaction #1 does not commit, those records will be locked forever, unless the connection drops, or innodb decides to rollback the transaction due to a deadlock detection.

but since the id 2 was changed to id 3 by the transaction that was executed first, no record was returned.

Isn't that what you want? if not, then you are not using SELECT ... FOR UPDATE properly. see http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/innodb-locking-reads.html

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Yes, this is what I want. But I do not want the lock if the commit does not happen due to some reason, for e.g. user aborted the connection. Besides, is there a way to know how many records are locked for update at any given time? –  shantanuo Dec 30 '10 at 7:15
1  
@shantanuo If the user aborted the connection, the transaction will get rolled back automatically. –  The Scrum Meister Dec 30 '10 at 7:17
    
working with transactions you should handle the fact you have some waiting tasks. But you can change the timeout duration dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/… –  regilero Dec 30 '10 at 8:21

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