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class CHaraICICCC
{
int i;
char c1;
int j;
char c2;
char c3;
char c4;
};

class CHaraIICCCC
{
int i;
int j;
char c1;
char c2;
char c3;
char c4;
};

void fun()
{
    CHaraICICCC eici;
    CHaraIICCCC eiicc;

    int icic = sizeof(eici); // -> output of icic is 16.
    int iicc = sizeof(eiicc); // -> output of icic is 12.
}

If any one knows, Please let me know why like this. Thanks Hara

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3 Answers 3

Because of alignment. x86 compilers tend to align int types on 4 bytes boundary (for faster memory access) so CHaraICICCC would probably be laid out as this:

byte  0: \
byte  1: | <--- int i
byte  2: |
byte  3: /  
byte  4: <----- char c1
byte  5: \
byte  6: | <--- Padding (wasted bytes)
byte  7: / 
byte  8: \
byte  9: | <--- int j  
byte 10: |
byte 11: /
byte 12: <----- char c2
byte 13: <----- char c3
byte 14: <----- char c4

for a total of 15 bytes, while CHaraIICCCC would be:

byte  0: \
byte  1: | <--- int i
byte  2: |
byte  3: /  
byte  4: \
byte  5: | <--- int j 
byte  6: |
byte  7: /
byte  8: <----- char c1
byte  9: <----- char c2
byte 10: <----- char c3
byte 11: <----- char c4

for a total of 12 bytes (with no bytes wasted for padding). Of course, this is much compiler-related and dependant on your compilation options.

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Hi Simone, thanks for your quick reply. Is that the bytes between byte4 and byte8, will be loss for us? (In general settings in the visual studio) and those three bytes are just being added, because first member is int? is it not possible to avoid that loss? –  Haranadh Gupta Dec 30 '10 at 7:42
    
If you want to use the first layout and avoiding the loss of the three bytes, you must instruct your compiler to use 1-byte padding. I think that this applies to you (you have to declare align(8)). –  Simone Dec 30 '10 at 7:51
1  
@Haranadh Gupta: Word alignment is used to improve performance on some architectures. If you choose to pack the data structure, to 'save' bytes, you may find the resultant code becomes larger and slower. There are reasons why you might want to adjust the packing and alignment, but saving space is seldom one of them. –  Clifford Dec 30 '10 at 8:17

With the default pack mode, on most architectures, members will be aligned at an offset (from the start of the structure) which is a multiple of their size.

If neccessary, padding bytes will be added to the structure to obtain that alignment.

So, assuming default packing and 4-byte integers, your first structure is really like this:

class CHaraICICCC
{
    int i;
    char c1;
    char padding[3];
    int j;
    char c2;
    char c3;
    char c4;
};
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Correction: Primitive members are aligned at an offset that's a multiple of their size; user-defined structs are not! –  Mehrdad Dec 30 '10 at 8:07

Stretching the question of "why" a little, I think I read somewhere that the reason for alignment is that it lets the CPU ignore bits of the data -- if your data is known to be 8-byte aligned, for example, the CPU can just ignore the 3 lower bits of the address, which improves efficiency. I could be wrong, but if I remember correctly, that's why CPUs require or prefer alignment.

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This answer is not entirely unrelated to reality, but the situation inside the CPU is really very complex. Functionally, some CPUs cannot access unaligned memory at all, or have to fall back to a sequence of microcode instructions internally to access unaligned memory in stages (which is slower than the aligned case, of course). In cases where unaligned access is required but not supported by the CPU, the compiler has to generate extra code to emulate it (by accessing aligned memory on 'either side' of the requested address and then shifting the result into place). –  John Bartholomew Dec 30 '10 at 8:50

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