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when a variable is initialize both in local scope as well as global scope how can we use global scope without using this keyword in the same class?

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6  
I'm not sure what you mean by "global scope" in the context of Java. A code sample would go a long way for this question. –  MatrixFrog Dec 30 '10 at 7:34
2  
Why would you try to avoid using 'this'? That is the way to do it. –  StaxMan Dec 30 '10 at 8:49
    
Given that Java doesn't have global scope, I don't understand the question. Can you please clarify? –  Jörg W Mittag Dec 30 '10 at 12:14

5 Answers 5

class MyClass{
    int i;//1
    public void myMethod(){
        i = 10;//referring to 1    
    }

    public void myMethod(int i){//2
        i = 10;//referring to 2
        this.i = 10 //refering to 1    
    }    
}  

Also See :

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If you do not use this it will always be the local variable.

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1  
If there is no variable in local scope with the same name as a instance variable then you can use the instance variable with out the this prefix –  Arun P Johny Dec 30 '10 at 9:10

It is impossible without this. The phenomenon is called variable hiding.

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If you are scoping the variable reference with this it will always point to the instance variable.

If a method declares a local variable that has the same name as a class-level variable, the former will 'shadow' the latter. To access the class-level variable from inside the method body, use the this keyword.

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1  
If you are scoping the variable reference with this it will always point to the FIELD variable. –  Vladimir Ivanov Dec 30 '10 at 8:03
    
@Vladimir You are right. I've corrected that. It was a mistake. –  Arun P Johny Dec 30 '10 at 9:08
public class VariableScope {

    int i=12;// Global
    public VariableScope(int i){// local

        System.out.println("local :"+i);
        System.out.println("Global :"+getGlobal());
    }
    public int getGlobal(){
        return i;
    }
}
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