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While showing a model in Django's admin's list_display, I'd like to sort first by one column, then by another.
Here's an example model:

class Customer(models.Model):
    name  = models.CharField(max_length=30)
    the_date = models.DateField()

How could this be achieved?

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3 Answers 3

I think you are looking for the "ordering" attribute of an admin class.

http://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.3/ref/contrib/admin/

Edit: My previous answer is incorrect. According to the documentation above, Django only honors the first entry in the tuple. There is/was a ticket to resolve this that went nowhere. There are various other proposed solutions that I also tried, but none of them seemed to work with my version of Django.

However, I came back to this problem today as part of a project and finally found something that worked for me. My solution was based upon this Django snippet, and I will post the snippet code here for completeness.

from django.contrib import admin
from django.contrib.admin.views.main import ChangeList
from tunes.models import Song

class SpecialOrderingChangeList(ChangeList):
    def apply_special_ordering(self, queryset):
        order_type, order_by = [self.params.get(param, None) for param in ('ot', 'o')]
        special_ordering = self.model_admin.special_ordering
        if special_ordering and order_type and order_by:
            try:
                order_field = self.list_display[int(order_by)]
                ordering = special_ordering[order_field]
                if order_type == 'desc':
                    ordering = ['-' + field for field in ordering]
                queryset = queryset.order_by(*ordering)
            except IndexError:
                return queryset
            except KeyError:
                return queryset
        return queryset

    def get_query_set(self):
        queryset = super(SpecialOrderingChangeList, self).get_query_set()
        queryset = self.apply_special_ordering(queryset)
        return queryset

class SongAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    list_display = ['name', 'time', 'artist', 'album', 'track', 'total_tracks']
    special_ordering = {'artist': ('artist', 'album', 'track'), 'album': ('album', 'track')}

    def get_changelist(self, request, **kwargs):
        return SpecialOrderingChangeList

admin.site.register(Song, SongAdmin)
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Nope. Django documentation says on ordering: "Django will only honor the first element in the list/tuple; any others will be ignored." –  Jonathan Jan 6 '11 at 18:41
    
Well-spotted. Funny, I have used this lots of times assuming that because it was a tuple, it was ordering by all the columns. I guess I've never noticed that it didn't! In that case, I think we would have to override the queryset() method of the model's ModelAdmin to change the sort order. –  bogeymin Jan 7 '11 at 1:10
    
I tried that too and it didn't help. If you happen to succeed in this direction, could you please post your code? –  Jonathan Jan 12 '11 at 11:54
    
Thanks; this essentially worked; though I cut down on the answer a bit (and posted as a different answer). –  dr jimbob Oct 11 '11 at 6:20
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This is based on bogeyman Apr 1 edited answer, but broken down to the essential feature.

In my models.py define ordering in the models Meta as usual:

class Customer(models.Model):
    name  = models.CharField(max_length=30)
    the_date = models.DateField()

    class Meta:
        ordering = ('the_date', 'name') # sort by date then name.

Then in admin.py subclass ChangeList, but force the query_set to ultimately be sorted by the ordering specified in the Meta of the model.

from django.contrib import admin
from django.contrib.admin.views.main import ChangeList


class SpecialOrderingChangeList(ChangeList):
    def get_query_set(self):
        queryset = super(SpecialOrderingChangeList, self).get_query_set()
        return queryset.order_by(*self.model._meta.ordering)

class CustomerAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    def get_changelist(self, request, **kwargs):
        return SpecialOrderingChangeList

admin.site.register(Customer, CustomerAdmin)

If you'd rather define the ordering in the ModelAdmin; you could do that as well; just change return queryset.order_by(*self.model._meta.ordering) to return queryset.order_by(*self.model_admin.ordering) and add a list defining ordering = ['the_date', 'name'] in CustomerAdmin.

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You can achieve this by using Django trunk rather than 1.3

https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/contrib/admin/

New in Django Development version.

If you need to specify a dynamic order (for example depending on user or language) you can implement a get_ordering() method.

Changed in Django Development version.

Django honors all elements in the list/tuple; before 1.4, only the first was respected.

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